lavender

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Related to Lavandula angustifolia: Lavandula officinalis

lavender,

common name for any plant of the genus Lavandula, herbs or shrubby plants of the family Labiatae (mintmint,
in botany, common name for members of the Labiatae, a large family of chiefly annual or perennial herbs. Several species are shrubby or climbing forms or, rarely, small trees.
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 family), most of which are native to the Mediterranean region but naturalized elsewhere. The true lavender (L. officinalis) has grayish foliage and small blue or pale purplish flowers (white in one variety). It is popular for herb gardens and is cultivated commercially (chiefly in France and England) or, more commonly, gathered wild (in S Europe) for the fragrant flowers, valued for scenting linens and clothes and as the source of oil of lavender. The oil is distilled for use in perfumery, in toilet preparations (e.g., lavender water). Lavender is sometimes used as a flavoring. Spike lavender (L. latifolia), a broader-leaved, less fragrant species, yields spike-lavender oil, which is also used in perfumery and in varnishes and porcelain painting. Lavender is classified in the division MagnoliophytaMagnoliophyta
, division of the plant kingdom consisting of those organisms commonly called the flowering plants, or angiosperms. The angiosperms have leaves, stems, and roots, and vascular, or conducting, tissue (xylem and phloem).
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, class Magnoliopsida, order Lamiales, family Labiatae.
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lavender

lavender

39 Species with varying leaf shapes, in the mint family, so all are edible. The pretty sweet, spicy, perfumed flowers are edible. Great in sweet and savory dishes, custards, etc. For stress, headache, intestinal gas, rheumatism psoriasis. Protects fabrics and clothes from moths.

lavender

1. any of various perennial shrubs or herbaceous plants of the genus Lavandula, esp L. vera, cultivated for its mauve or blue flowers and as the source of a fragrant oil (oil of lavender): family Lamiaceae (labiates)
2. the dried parts of L. vera, used to perfume clothes
3. a pale or light bluish-purple to a very pale violet colour
4. perfume scented with lavender
References in periodicals archive ?
Chemical composition, anti-schistosomal and cytotoxic effects of the essential oil of Lavandula angustifolia grown in southeastern Brazil.
Rose (Rosa damascena) and lavender (Lavandula angustifolia) relieved anxiety and depression in postpartum women (Conrad & Adams, 2012).
TABLE 1: Chemical analysis of essential oils of Foeniculum vulgare and Lavandula angustifolia grown in Iran by GC-MS.
Three representative lavender cultivars, namely, "Colgate" "Hidcote," and "Maillette" from Lavandula angustifolia species and two cultivars, namely, "Alba" and "Grosso," from Lavandula x intermedia species were chosen.
Differential accumulation of volatile terpene and terpene synthase mRNAs during lavender (Lavandula angustifolia and L.
(Lavandula angustifolia) Fragrant and not as much of a space hog as taller species, 'Compacta' grows to a tidy 1(1/2) feet.
Silver foliage shrubs and perennials such as the sunloving lavandula angustifolia, brachyglottis Sunshine and helichrysum italicum provide soft, silver mounds of foliage.
Silver foliage shrubs and perennials such as the sun-loving Lavandula angustifolia, Brachyglottis 'Sunshine' and Helichrysum italicum provide soft, silver mounds of foliage and can be trimmed back after flowering in summer and again in early spring to keep them in shape.
Lavandula Angustifolia EoAC" or true lavender EoAC" has been cleverly worked into a new lavender collection for summer.
Etherio, a new variety of Lavandula angustifolia with improved essential oil production and composition from natural selected genotypes growing in Greece.
Lavender (Lavandula angustifolia) Botanical family: Lamiaceae or Labiatae (mint)
The dried herbs assessed were juhua (Chrysanthemum morifolium), honeysuckle (Lonicera japonica), jasmine (Jasminum sambac), lavender (Lavandula angustifolia), rose (Rosa damascene), osmanthus (Osmanthus fragrans), duzhong (Eucommia ulmoides), jiaogulan (Gynostemmapentaphyllum), lemongrass (Cymbopogon citrates), and yerba mate (Ilexparaguariensis), many of which are popular teas in a number of Asian countries.