kerning

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kerning

[′kərn·iŋ]
(graphic arts)
Adjusting the spacing between certain letters during typesetting so that part of each letter overhangs adjacent letters.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

kerning

(text)
The process of reducing the spacing between certain pairs of letters to improve their appearance. When a font is created, each character is given a width that includes some space around it so that the letters don't run into each other when displayed or printed. This can be thought of as an invisible box around each character. Some pairs of characters such as A and V, look better if the boxes overlap slightly, bringing the characters closer together (but still not touching).

See also tracking, leading.
This article is provided by FOLDOC - Free Online Dictionary of Computing (foldoc.org)

kerning

In proportional spacing, the tightening of white space between letters to create a visually appealing flow to the text. Due to the slanted vertical lines in two-letter combinations such as AW, WA and TA, kerning reduces the white space between them for a better appearance. See proportional spacing and tracking.


Kerned Characters
Note the vertical red lines. Not only is there no additional white space between the letters, they actually overlap into each other's space. Kerning is not used on monospaced fonts.
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