Lawgiving


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Lawgiving

See also Justice.
Draco
(fl. 621 B.C.) codified Athenian law. [Gk. Hist.: Benét, 286]
Hammurabi
Babylonian king (c. 1800 B.C.); established first systematic legal code. [Classical Hist.: EB, 8: 598–599]
Justinian
(485–565) ruler of eastern empire; codified Roman law. [Rom. Hist.: EB, 10: 362–365]
Minos
scrupulous king and lawgiver of Crete. [Gk. Myth.: Wheeler, 244]
Moses
presents God’s ten commandments to Israelites. [O.T.: Exodus 20:1–12]
Solon
(c. 639–c. 559 B.C.) Athenian statesman and wise legislator. [Gk. Hist.: Brewer Dictionary, 1018]
Talmud
great body of Jewish law and tradition, supplementing scripture. [Judaism: Haydn & Fuller, 725]
References in periodicals archive ?
The second does so by ensuring that the guidance is intelligible to each individual as "a lawgiving member in the kingdom of ends." The second constraint also compensates for the fact that statutory guidance can never be total, and is sometimes left deliberately vague in order to permit officials to develop and adapt the law to changing circumstances.
jurisdiction" (81) not from the state's lawgiving authority to
1 of the Charter: "The Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms guarantees the rights and freedoms set out in it subject only to such reasonable limits prescribed by law as can be demonstrably justified in a free and democratic society." (38) all majoritarian lawgiving must be consistent with the foundational values that underlie the democratic order.
Promised Lands: From Colonial Lawgiving to Postcolonial Takeovers in Fiji.
Schechter believed in a lawgiving God and a law that actualized through the interpretive act which constituted the heart of Jewish civilization, i.e., Oral Torah.
If, however, a government were to follow the lead of the Alabama Supreme Court and surround the document with other lawgiving texts, such as the Magna Carta and the Bill of Rights, (320) the result would not be so clear according to the reasonable person test.
For the only fathers in Laclos's text are parodic, travesties of the lawgiving patriarchal figure.
And one cannot say: the human being in a state has sacrificed a part of his innate outer freedom for the sake of an end, but rather, he has relinquished entirely his wild, lawless freedom in order to find his freedom as such undiminished, in a dependence upon laws, that is, in a rightful condition, since this dependence arises from his own lawgiving will.
Thus, he says, a god's vrata "is established through [that god's] concrete activity, i.e., not through an act of lawgiving." (6) It is an order or pattern, ari sing directly out of divine precedent, that is continually actualized in the world, such that creatures and things adapt themselves to it, and comply with it.
(21) This is not inconsistent with Kant's claim in The Doctrine of Virtue that ethics provides an end because "since men's sensible inclinations tempt them to ends (the matter of choice) that can be contrary to duty, lawgiving reason can in turn check their influence only by a moral end set up against the ends of inclination, an end that must therefore be given a priori, independently of any inclinations".
As its sobriquet suggests, the Classical style has come to be viewed as lawgiving. Yet in a wider historical sense it has transpired to be anything but this.
Carefully notice the textual reverberations among other parts of the instrument -- the references to "the people" in the Preamble, the Ninth and Tenth Amendments and the Assembly Clause of the First -- and you'll see the higher lawgiving populace reserving to voting majorities of itself the right to revise their legislative product at will.