Lawgiving


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Lawgiving

See also Justice.
Draco
(fl. 621 B.C.) codified Athenian law. [Gk. Hist.: Benét, 286]
Hammurabi
Babylonian king (c. 1800 B.C.); established first systematic legal code. [Classical Hist.: EB, 8: 598–599]
Justinian
(485–565) ruler of eastern empire; codified Roman law. [Rom. Hist.: EB, 10: 362–365]
Minos
scrupulous king and lawgiver of Crete. [Gk. Myth.: Wheeler, 244]
Moses
presents God’s ten commandments to Israelites. [O.T.: Exodus 20:1–12]
Solon
(c. 639–c. 559 B.C.) Athenian statesman and wise legislator. [Gk. Hist.: Brewer Dictionary, 1018]
Talmud
great body of Jewish law and tradition, supplementing scripture. [Judaism: Haydn & Fuller, 725]
References in periodicals archive ?
The second does so by ensuring that the guidance is intelligible to each individual as "a lawgiving member in the kingdom of ends.
national lawgiving authority in relation to other states, there is
Within the Charter framework, democracy is not an open-ended activity that determines its own purposes, but the mode of lawgiving through which a free people gives itself laws that bring society into closer conformity with "substantive goals".
21) This is not inconsistent with Kant's claim in The Doctrine of Virtue that ethics provides an end because "since men's sensible inclinations tempt them to ends (the matter of choice) that can be contrary to duty, lawgiving reason can in turn check their influence only by a moral end set up against the ends of inclination, an end that must therefore be given a priori, independently of any inclinations".
As its sobriquet suggests, the Classical style has come to be viewed as lawgiving.
Carefully notice the textual reverberations among other parts of the instrument -- the references to "the people" in the Preamble, the Ninth and Tenth Amendments and the Assembly Clause of the First -- and you'll see the higher lawgiving populace reserving to voting majorities of itself the right to revise their legislative product at will.
James Harrington, The Art of Lawgiving in Three Books (1659) excerpted and reprinted in Wooten, ed.
Writing of Israelite theocracy in his Art of Lawgiving, Harrington asserts the identity of rational action and Divine Will: "That God elected the King in Israel is certain; and that the people no less for that, did also elect the King is also certain.
The process of founding involves setting in motion the idea for a fundamental change, devising a plan for the new order of society (this is the lawgiving activity strictly understood), and then acting to put the plan into effect.
While Sweet states that "the broadest insight gained from addressing the unity of Kant's practical philosophy from the perspective of the unconditioned is a re-envisioning of the relationship between individual moral goodness and the state, religion, and history, namely, community," there are five interrelated and provocative theses that undergird this "re-envisioning": (1) Kant's concept of the will entails that "reason is not only lawgiving but at the same time end-setting.
Judge Sloviter finds the dearth of attention to the federalism implications of diversity jurisdiction puzzling in light of what she deems "the unavoidable intrusion of the federal courts in the lawgiving function of state courts.
It seems implausible to think that there could be a natural duty to comply with any old law promulgated by any old lawgiving entity.