Lawrence of Brindisi, Saint

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Lawrence of Brindisi, Saint

(brēn`dēzē), 1559–1619, Italian Capuchin priest, Doctor of the Church, b. Brindisi, kingdom of Naples, as Cesare De Rossi. He joined the Capuchin Friars at the age of 16, then studied theology and languages at the Univ. of Padua. Ordained in 1582, he taught theology and preached in several languages. In 1599 he was enlisted to preach against Protestantism in Austria and Bohemia, and was then appointed head chaplain of the army of the Holy Roman Empire. In 1601 he was credited with inspiring the army to victory at Székesfehérvár against a larger force of Ottoman Turks. Following a period as vicar general of the Capuchin Friars (1602–5), he then evangelized in Germany. Lawrence was sent on many diplomatic missions by Pope Paul V and also served as papal nuncio to Bavaria and Spain. Feast: July 21.
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The Standard Bearer of the Roman Church: Lawrence of Brindisi & Capuchin Missions in the Holy Roman Empire (1599-1613)
Saint Lawrence of Brindisi (1559-1619) was a major religious and political figure of the Reformation period, says Drenas, but is barely known today, at least partly because the Capuchin Order he belonged to has itself been little studied except internally.
Saint Lawrence of Brindisi (Pinterest / MANILA BULLETIN)
Lawrence of Brindisi is the best known--the Jesuits Peter Canisius and Robert Bellarmine, and Frangois de Sales.
Ellington readily acknowledges that Lawrence of Brindisi praised Mary's body as much as any of the earlier preachers.
Some of their greatest preachers, such as Saint Lawrence of Brindisi (d.
(41.) L'Immacolata nella provincia parmense, 16-17, 24-26; Melchior da Pobladura, 1:182-85; Simbula; Lawrence of Brindisi, Marialae.
That being said, it could be argued that great theological figures like Martin Luther or John Calvin contributed more to the shaping of Christian theology in general than figures of only historical interest like Isidore of Seville or Lawrence of Brindisi, who are included on the current roster.
Saint Lawrence of Brindisi (1559-1619), Italian Capuchin Franciscan, influential post-Reformation preacher [1959].
which wrung that sweat and blood from the Lord's body."(55) Saint Lawrence of Brindisi also agreed that Christ's griefs were so many swords "transfixing his heart."(56)
For example, even Saint Lawrence of Brindisi, a fervent devotee of Mary's cult, pays scant attention to her when he preaches on the Passion.(57)
Saint Francois de Sales and Saint Lawrence of Brindisi give Mary's love a particularly prominent place in their sermons.
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