Le Chapelier Law


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Le Chapelier Law

 

an antilabor law adopted in France during the Great French Revolution by the Constituent Assembly on June 14, 1791, on the proposal of the deputy I. Le Chapelier, a lawyer from Rennes who supported the interests of the big bourgeoisie. The Le Chapelier Law prohibited the association of workers in trade unions and other associations, as well as strikes, under punishment of deprivation of political rights for one year and a fine of 500 francs. “The French bourgeoisie,” wrote K. Marx, “during the very first storms of revolution dared to take away from the workers the right of association but just acquired” (K. Marx and F. Engels, Soch, 2nd ed., vol. 23. pp. 751–72). In 1794, during the Jacobin dictatorship, Le Chapelier was accused of counterrevolutionary activity and was executed; however, his law remained in force. The prohibition of strikes was repealed only in 1864; the freedom of trade union activity was not reinstated in France until 1884.

References in periodicals archive ?
The revolutionary lawyer and politician Jean Le Chapelier (1754-1794) introduced the "Le Chapelier Law," which was enacted on 14 June, 1791.
The Le Chapelier Law (1795-1866) banned compulsory membership in organizations in an effort to promote free markets (p.
This was followed by the Le Chapelier law which, among other things, forbade workers from the same profession from coming together in assemblies.
The Revolutionary events themselves are in the background: the early moderate phase, Robespierre's dream of the Republic of Letters, the effect of the Le Chapelier law of 1792 on theatrical production, the identification of specific cultural policies as being integral to the construction of the nation, the mythologizing of the volcano-like eruption of political change that was 1789.
Historians have debated whether the later elimination of these organizations in June 1791 by the Le Chapelier law was an effort to suppress political dissent or simply to eliminate a bastion of privilege.
The concept ran counter to laws passed during the 1789 revolution, however, such as the Le Chapelier law of 1791 which had banned worker associations.
Ironically this is what the Le Chapelier law of 1791 had made possible for all theatres.
Hirsch's careful readings of the famous d'Allarde and Le Chapelier laws of 1791 and the debates surrounding them reveal the relationship between attacks on corporations and assertion of a need for regulatory bodies.