Le Fanu


Also found in: Dictionary, Wikipedia.

Le Fanu

(Joseph) Sheridan. 1814--73, Irish writer, best known for his stories of mystery and the supernatural, esp Uncle Silas (1864) and the collection In a Glass Darkly (1872)
References in periodicals archive ?
Nina Auerbach, a literary Van Helsing (and professor of English at the University of Pennsylvania), hunts the vampire uphill (she begins with Byron in 1816) and, mostly, downdale: from John Polidori's The Vampyre (1819) and Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu's Carmilla (1872), through Bram Stoker's Dracula 1897)--the centerpiece, rendering all other vampires B.S.
The author examines the contributions of Charles Robert Maturin, Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu, and Bram Stoker to the Irish Gothic tradition and vampire story.
Their failure highlights, in a way that probably exaggerates the quality of works such as Sheridan le Fanu's sensationalist Uncle Silas and Stoker's gothic extravaganza Dracula (a work, which like Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes stories, lives, I have always thought, more powerfully in filmic versions than in the original text), how well-nigh impossible their task probably was.
By frequently rewriting his short stories and novels, Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu (1814-73) created challenges for his bibliographers, editors, and interpreters.
While the influence on O'Brien of the Einsteins and Schrodingers has been investigated in detail by Keith Hopper, Charles Kemnitz, and others, there is also something to be said for Roger Boylan's assertion of Gothic fabulist Sheridan Le Fanu's influence on the author ("We Laughed" 2008).
Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu seems to have shared with J.R.R.
He also recommends Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu's famously frightening Madam Crowl's Ghost (1870).
Hangovers invariably bring on bouts of heartburn or hiccups and a passage from a research paper by Dr James Le Fanu is well worth repeating.
In this study of the fictions of Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu (1814-1873), the Anglo-Irish writer of Gothic tales and mystery novels perhaps best known for Uncle Silas, Walton (emeritus, English, U.
Sheridan Le Fanu's famous vampire tale 'Carmilla' as presented by the team of Rod Lott and Lisa K.
PE: 'A few years ago, I was involved in a meeting and I asked Dr James le Fanu [a medical writer and author of The Rise and Fall of Modern Medicine] to sum up what he took from it.
REVIEWING Ian Robinson's The English Prophets: A Critical Defence of English Criticism (2001) in The Cambridge Quarterly (2002), Mark Le Fanu writes: