lead chloride

lead chloride

[′led ′klȯr‚īd]
(inorganic chemistry)
PbCl2 Poisonous white crystals melting at 498°C, boiling at 950°C; slightly soluble in hot water, insoluble in alcohol and cold water; used to make lead salts and lead chromate pigments and as an analytical reagent.
References in periodicals archive ?
The CNT is infused with chloride and when the cartridge is dipped in lead-contaminated water, the lead and chloride react to form lead chloride molecules in the CNT.
Scientists from the Louvre Museum and the CNRS Research Institute used an electrode which was one-tenth the thickness of a human hair to look at the effect lead chloride salt synthesised by Egyptians had on a single cell.
The research was carried out using a tiny electrode, the 10th of the size of a hair, to look at the effect of a lead chloride synthesised by the Egyptians (laurionite) on a single cell.
The researchers used a tiny electrode, a 10th of the thickness of a human hair, to look at the effect of lead chloride salt synthesised by the Egyptians -- laurionite -- on a single cell.
Lead acetate reacts with ferric chloride to produce insoluble white lead chloride.
The pregnant solution is cooled to crystallize lead chloride, followed by precipitation of the remaining metals by scrap iron.
The first step of metal recovery is to cool the pregnant solution to drop out most of the lead chloride while the other metals remain in solution.
This is also an order of magnitude lower solubility than basic lead chloride, the most common reaction product of stabilization with lead oxides.
Stabilization with dibasic lead phthalate provides slightly better retention of volume resistivity, as shown in figure 1, probably because of the lower water solubility of dichlorodibasic lead phthalate as compared to basic lead chloride.
AoBut Aowhether or not the manufacture of these lead chlorides was deliberately connected to preventive health care by Egyptians,Ao the researchers wrote, Aoit is clear that such intentional production remains the first known example of a large scale chemic process.