Leaf Roller Moths

The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Leaf Roller Moths

 

(Tortricidae), a family of moths. Wingspan, 1–3 cm. The front wings vary in color, and the hind wings are gray. The proboscis is poorly developed, but the moths can suck water or the juices of plants. The caterpillars live hidden in leaves that are wound into a horn or pocket and fastened with silk. In feeding, they frequently bore passages in buds, young shoots, blossoms, bark, fruits, and seeds. They pupate in their feeding places, in litter, and in the soil. Leaf roller moths hibernate in either the pupal stage or another stage, depending strictly on the particular species.

Approximately 5,000 species are known, living throughout the world but most commonly found in tropical forests of Asia. There are more than 1,200 species in the USSR, of which more than 300 are harmful. Particularly extensive damage to forests is caused by fruit moths. The grape moth (Polychrosis botrana) harms vineyards, the European oak roller moth (Tortrix viridand) attacks oaks, and several species from such genera as Rhyacionia and Petrova harm conifers.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.