Litter

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litter

1. a group of offspring produced at one birth by a mammal such as a sow
2. a layer of partly decomposed leaves, twigs, etc., on the ground in a wood or forest

Litter

 

a layer of the remains of dead plants on the soil surface in a forest, meadow, or steppe. Its thickness varies from a fraction of a centimeter to 30 cm or greater. In spruce forests of the taiga zone, there are 40–80 tons of litter per hectare (ha), and in oak forests of the forest steppe 8–15 tons per ha.


Litter

 

the dead branches, leaves, and other parts of plants that have fallen onto the ground or the bottom of a body of water. The annual accumulation of such organic matter on the soil surface and in the forest is called litter.

References in periodicals archive ?
Plants also affect the decomposition process directly through the quality of their leaf litter.
Asian cockroaches were found in leaf litter (primarily oak) or pine straw in all locations in Dothan where they were detected.
A 24 hour study showed that their activity increases during the morning and decreases by afternoon, except at the dunes where crabs are active at night, and use most of this time to eat leaf litter and clean their burrows (Delfosse, 1990; Capistran-Barradas, personal observation).
Nitrogen immobilization in decaying hardwood leaf litter as a function of initial nitrogen and lignin content.
The proteoid root mats were concentrated in the uppermost 40 mm portion of the soil profile and were often overlain by a layer 1-5 mm thick of unconsolidated soil material, consisting of a combination of single-grain quartz sand, comminuted leaf litter, and charcoal fragments.
Such a high proportion of leaf litter has been observed by several authors (Gosz et al.
Over the span of 12 weeks, the team collected samples of water, soil, roots, young leaves and leaf litter (fallen leaves).
Together, these observations suggest that arthropod activity was less likely to be a major driver of differences between grass leaf litter decomposition in the mesh bags used in the present study, and that abiotic process were important factors, similar to other arid ecosystems.
Autumn leaf litter contributes a significant amount of phosphorus to urban stormwater, which then runs off into waterways and lakes.
Leaf litter intercepted by bromeliads provides microhabitat and nutrients to organisms such as bacteria and fungi, detritivores, and deposit feeders (Frank, 1983; Armbruster et al.