Leaf-Nosed Bat


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Leaf-Nosed Bat

 

any one mammal of the family Phyllostomatidae of the suborder Microchiroptera. At the end of the muzzle there is a vertical, sharpened leathery appendage (nose-leaf), which is sometimes very complex in form. There are seven subfamilies, comprising 49 genera, found in the tropics and subtropics of America. Some of these bats are insectivorous; the members of some subfamilies feed on fruit pulp, nectar, and pollen. The vampire bats of the genus Vampyrum feed on both insects and fruits; the large Javelin bats of the genus Phyllostomus prey on small vertebrates.

References in periodicals archive ?
Roost selection by Formosan leaf-nosed bats (Hipposideros armiger terasensis).
The actual names for the bats shown are: the Slit-Faced bat, the Spear-Nosed bat, the Tube-Nosed bat, the Pocketed Free-Tailed bat, the Leaf-Nosed bat, and the Flying Fox.
Most bats are insect feeders, while the New World Leaf-Nosed bats eat nectar, fruit, frogs, lizards and even blood.
For example, common brown bats make very loud sounds, while leaf-nosed bats are soft-spoken.
At Joshua Tree National Park, mine surveys have protected, California leaf-nosed bats, and similar work at Death Valley National Park has secured Townsend's big-eared bat maternity roosts and the largest hibernaculum known in the California desert.
In the vicinity of the area chosen for the airport site by the government, there are apparently three limestone caves and research conducted in September revealed 350 bats, including 100 old world leaf-nosed bats according to Kyodo News.
A proposed new species, Shimoni bat virus, has recently been isolated from Hipposideros commersoni leaf-nosed bats (3).