League to Save Lake Tahoe

League to Save Lake Tahoe

Address:955 Emerald Bay Rd
South Lake Tahoe, CA 96150

Phone:530-541-5388
Fax:530-541-5454
Web: www.keeptahoeblue.org
Established: 1957. Description:Dedicated to the protection and restoration of Lake Tahoe and its surrounding basin. Members: 4,000. Dues: $50/year.
Publications: Keep Tahoe Blue News (quarterly); free to members and free online.

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Parks Directory of the United States, 5th Edition. © 2007 by Omnigraphics, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The League to Save Lake Tahoe held its second bi-annual Basin Blitz this spring to assess progress in improving Lake Tahoe's stormwater infrastructure (pipes, drains and sediment-catching basins).
"Without periodically assessing our stormwater infrastructure, we have no idea how well it is safeguarding Lake Tahoe from pollution," said Zack Bradford, the natural resource manager for the League to Save Lake Tahoe. "Thanks to the hard work of our citizen-scientist volunteers, we can now quickly take the pulse of these systems and address concerns head on."
Volunteers for the League to Save Lake Tahoe install erosion control measures following the 2007 Angora fire near South Lake Tahoe.
A volunteer for the League to Save Lake Tahoe plants a seedling after the Angora fire of 2007.
Young, who earned a master's degree in atmospheric science from the University of Nevada, Reno, also was a top administrator of the League to Save Lake Tahoe conservation group.
Immediately after TRPA adopted the 1984 plan, the State of California and the League to Save Lake Tahoe filed suit against TRPA in the U.S.
1984 Plan: Regarding the period between TRPA's adoption of a regional plan in 1984, and its adoption of the current plan in 1987, the court found no liability based upon a lack of "causation." (65) As explained above, immediately after TRPA adopted the 1984 plan, the State of California and the League to Save Lake Tahoe filed suit against TRPA in the U.S.
Dave Roberts, assistant executive director of the environmental watchdog group the League to Save Lake Tahoe, would like to see history repeated.
"Salvage logging is not designed to reduce fire danger," claims Laurel Ames, executive director of the League to Save Lake Tahoe. "It is designed to get the timber out, keep the mills going, and get tax revenues to the politically connected counties." Despite Forest Service assurances to the contrary, Ames worries that the logging will increase erosion, and add to the development-caused sediment already clouding the lake's legendary clear waters.
The presentation came at the conclusion of a two-day scavenger hunt involving four travel bloggers, who competed to raise funds for the shelter and the League to Save Lake Tahoe, the non-profit behind the international Keep Tahoe Blue campaign.