lean manufacturing

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lean manufacturing

[¦lēn ‚man·ə′fak·chər·iŋ]
(industrial engineering)
A production system consisting of manufacturing cells linked together with a functionally integrated system for inventory and production control that uses less of the key resources needed to make goods.
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A series of interviews have already been held with government/ Ministry officials, hospital administrators (Registrars, Hospital CEOs), healthcare professionals (doctors and lead nurses), and suppliers to hospitals (pharmaceuticals and general equipment) as part of an ongoing research project to understand both the complexities of the Omani healthcare sector and the potential for applying Lean thinking to achieve higher efficiencies and quality improvements.
Lean Thinking, a phrase coined by Jim Womack and Dan Jones for the title of their critically acclaimed book Lean Thinking: Banish Waste and Create Wealth in Your' Corporation (Simon & Schuster, New York, 1996), is a term used to describe a mindset whereby an organization is focused on providing value to a customer or client, rather than on "the numbers.
Efforts to avoid or remove waste--either from a business production cycle or in every day life--are prevalent throughout history, and the storied tenure of these attempts form much of the basis of Lean thinking.
The last principle of Lean thinking is "perfection," or the elimination of all waste.
They too found that the distinction of lean thinking at the strategic level and lean production at the operational level is crucial to understanding lean as a whole in order to apply the right tools and strategies to provide customer value.
However, once this market began to realize that waste can come in other forms, lean thinking became more practical.
Lean thinking is a holistic management approach incorporating lean practices and principles.
Although many companies are removing waste from their processes, few are applying this lean thinking to their actual products, said Haydn Insley of MAS North West.
Lean thinking has been applied successfully in information-based environments such as healthcare, law enforcement and local authorities.
Lean Thinking will help leaders develop the skills they need for a successful journey in combating waste.