Lecompton

Lecompton

(ləkŏmp`tən), small town, Douglas co., NE Kans., on the Kansas River between Lawrence and Topeka. The pro-slavery Lecompton Constitution was formulated (Sept., 1857) there, and was ratified (Dec., 1857) after an election in which voters were given a choice only between limited or unlimited slavery; free state men refused to cast their ballots. President James Buchanan urged Congress to admit Kansas as a slave state under the Lecompton Constitution, but Stephen A. DouglasDouglas, Stephen Arnold,
1813–61, American statesman, b. Brandon, Vt. Senatorial Career

He was admitted to the bar at Jacksonville, Ill., in 1834. After holding various state and local offices he became a U.S.
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 and his followers broke with the pro-slavery Democrats, and the bill could not pass the House. At a subsequent election (Aug., 1858), Kansas voters decisively rejected the Lecompton Constitution. Kansas was later (1861) admitted as a free state.
References in periodicals archive ?
It found that Buchanan and his Democratic allies spread patronage around to secure the passage of the pro-slavery Lecompton Constitution of Kansas, over and above the wishes of the state's residents.
James Huston convincingly explores Buchanan's mind-set and rationale over Lecompton, arguing that he was "no prisoner of the Slavocracy" (p.
He also opposed the efforts of President James Buchanan and his Southern allies to enact a Federal slave code and impose the Lecompton Constitution on Kansas.
According to the Lawrence Journal-World, Douglas County, Kan., commissioners said that a proposed change in the sequence of mining at the Big Springs Quarry near Lecompton, Kan., needs to have a full review and public hearing at the city-county planning commission before it can be approved.
Douglas opposed the 1857 pro-slavery Lecompton Constitution, which he believed made a mockery of popular sovereignty.
Schoen's analysis thus connects the economic story of cotton with the politics of the first half of the nineteenth century, with apt attention to such key milestones as the LeCompton Constitution and Stephen Douglas's Freeport Doctrine.
Douglas himself had declared war against the Buchanan administration over the decision and the subsequent fiasco over the Lecompton constitution.
He came away from an 1840 county convention, complaining that "the country delegates made the nominations as they pleased; and they pleased to make them all from the country, except [Edward D.] Baker & me, whom they supposed necessary to make stump speeches." And however much Douglas ruled the Democrats of Illinois with a rod of iron, every Democrat in Illinois in 1858 knew that he had broken decisively with James Buchanan and the national party leadership over the Lecompton Constitution and popular sovereignty, and he had returned to Illinois in July with party loyalists unsure whether they could continue to be Douglas loyalists at the same time.
In 1857, the proslavery legislature, based in Lecompton, allowed the territory's residents to vote on whether the state constitution would allow slavery or merely forbid further importation of slaves.
"I hope the time will never come," Campbell said, "when the people of Dakota will have less spirit than did their fathers." Campbell reminded the convention of how the Democrats treated the people of Kansas in 1860 and how they "turned out their legislature and forced down their throats the Lecompton constitution." Campbell paid little heed to the concerns of the Democratic Congress, which, he said, the opponents of his provision treated as "demigods" and "czars." As Judge Edgerton was calling for the vote on Campbell's provision, a motion was made to adjourn.
What made Douglas all the more attractive was his leadership of the Congressional Republicans in the recent struggle over the Lecompton Constitution-the draft state constitution proposed by proslavery forces in Kansas.