Legists


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Legists

 

(1) Medieval jurists who helped disseminate Roman law in Western Europe. As advocates of centralized royal power, they called for the restriction of the jurisdiction of the manorial and ecclesiastic courts, as well as for municipal self-government. During the reception of Roman law in France, the legists included some of its norms in collections of provincial legal customs, which sometimes resulted in radical changes in the old law in the spirit of the Roman tradition. For example, under the influence of the legists, the old French rule of the division of an inheritance among sons was replaced by the principle of inheritance by all the children of the legator irrespective of sex and the equal distribution of the legacy among them. One of the most famous legists, the French jurist Beaumanoir, compiled a collection of French common law entitled The Customs of Beauvaisis.

(2) Ancient Chinese thinkers from the fifth to the third century B.C. The best-known legist was the scholar and political figure Shang Yang (390–338 B.C.).

References in periodicals archive ?
(27) For an etymological explication of the distinction between jurists ("ius") and legists ("lex"), see "The Lawful and The Legal" referred to in note 18.
(1.) Lisa Jefferson investigates twelfth-century Latin texts of cannon law, thirteenth-century Latin texts of secular legists, like Beumanoir, Blanot, Durandus, Baldus's fourteenth century text feudal law, as well as thirteenth- and fourteenth-century customaries in relation to the thirteenth debate among legal writers and theologians about regulatory procedures allowing communities to manage the conflicts of interests resulting from the multiple use of oaths as well as about an individual's moral condition.
Odofredus at Bologna serves as a case study of one who desired to benefit financially from his legal studies; jurists and legists were not philosophi who spumed lucre but rather could be men who made profitable loans to their students.
This is not to say that the rank and file of Islamic ulama are in favor of revolutionary apocalyptic movements, as the opposite holds true; when working within an established political system, state supporting theologians and legists prefer the often intricate balance between their own professional power base and that of the state which largely controls it.
The evolution of French constitutional thought during the sixteenth century required the formal treatises of legists to define and delimit legal terminology, the writings of contemporary historians to uncover the sources of political thought and practice, and finally, the pamphlet literature of a wide and discursive variety of ideologues.
Legists warned against such attitude, which is considered as a technique to save time prior to the Supreme Military Council (YAS) meeting.
It was an unwelcome development from the perspective of imperial legists of Byzantium, who regarded such private prisons as mitigating imperial sovereignty, (124) but despite the legists' vaunted efforts to abolish these private prisons, documentary evidence has shown that these efforts were, to a great extent, unsuccessful.
Denley notes that Siena had some eminent scholars, especially legists. But we learn nothing about why they were eminent.
A significant bid for educational power by local colleges of legists and physicians, the ubiquity of paid, private tutoring by professors looking to augment their incomes, and a shrinking academic calendar all played a role in dwindling numbers of students, lectures, and tuition.
By accommodating their theory to the status quo, the legists and theorists were able to give it real force.
Legists say that the court should act in accordance with the law and dismiss the demand for annulment.
Using fine sand for the ablution ritual in the absence of water, an act known as tayammum, was generally regarded as licit by the legists. (107) However, the Hanafi Kasani (d.