legrandite


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legrandite

[lə′gran‚dīt]
(mineralogy)
Zn14(OH)(AsO4)9·12H2O A yellow to nearly colorless mineral composed of basic hydrous zinc arsenate.
References in periodicals archive ?
7-cm cluster of legrandite crystals known as the "Aztec Sun.
World-class specimens of legrandite have also made the mine famous, especially the "Aztec Sun" specimen in the Romero collection.
Although not the largest known legrandite specimen, this example is considered to be the finest single crystal of the species.
The matrix specimen measured about 8 inches across and was an open maw of pale brown goethite with bright yellow legrandite crystals jutting into the opening like so many dragon teeth.
Almost lost in the bustling over legrandite was a cut stone of a species that was going to set the gem world on fire, a 123-carat faceted "tanzanite" zoisite, the largest known at the time.
The other great legrandite specimen, a cluster of two opposing sprays about 5 inches wide and 3 inches high, was named the "Aztec Sun" when it was first described in Rock and Gem magazine by this writer.
His display also contained two stunning specimens, a large legrandite and the even larger Bolivian phosphophyllite.
The American Museum of Natural History brought out that 7-inch legrandite known as the "Aztec Club" for everyone to see.
By species and owner/photographer they are: adamite, Schlepp/Currier; wulfenite, Harter/Scovil; legrandite, University of Arizona/Scovil; polybasite, Wallace/Wilson, and amethyst, Schlepp/Wilson.
358, and the Ojuela mine, Mexico "bowtie" legrandite pictured on p.
Al and Bernie Haag (Tucson, Arizona) once told me that they had sold Ed a very fine and expensive legrandite specimen, but it was too big for the compartment in one of his boxes.
Mexican-wise, there was also a good educational case on geology and mine locations in the Guanajuato mining district (with fine specimens too); an American Museum case of Guanajuato calcites from the Bement Collection; a Smithsonian case with their two extraordinary Zacatecas scorodites; and a case with the two great and famous Ojuela mine legrandite specimens, the ones they call "The Aztec Club" and "The Aztec Sun.