Leibnitz


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Leibnitz

, Leibniz
Baron Gottfried Wilhelm von . 1646--1716, German rationalist philosopher and mathematician. He conceived of the universe as a hierarchy of independent units or monads, synchronized by pre-established harmony. His works include Th?odic?e (1710) and Monadologia (1714). He also devised a system of calculus, independently of Newton
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Leibnitz, Elementele caracteristicii universale, 1679, Limba universala, caracteristica universala, calcul logic, Univers Enciclopedic, 2015.
As a historical investigation, the influence of other philosophers on Kant's understanding of spontaneity, from Leibnitz onward, is considered.
In speaking about these periods I will not take into account individual thinkers, because in many instances it may be found that certain thinkers (Plato, Lucretius, Leibnitz, etc.) in a given period were far ahead of their contemporaries, and that their theories or discoveries which had no great influence in their own time were prophetic expressions of the latest developments of science.
begins with a discussion of Elie Wiesel's play The Trial of God, where the problem of theodicy lies at the center of the drama; he then addresses Leibnitz's traditional affirmation of divine justice, Gordon Kaufman's approach to the question of evil "for a nuclear age," as well as a series of "pat answers" to the problem of suffering in this world (23-26).
The goal of this section is to demonstrate that, via a Green's function spectral domain approach and careful application of Leibnitz's rule, the apparent depolarizing dyads are removable for an unbounded homogeneous uniaxial anisotropic medium, leading to a mathematically and physically consistent theory.
Narun Asvarujanon, (1) Kenji Leibnitz, (2) Naoki Wakamiya, (1,2) and Masayuki Murata (1,2)
(the latter for m [member of] N = {1, 2, 3, ...}), For c = 0 one writes (1A) [sub.0][D.sup.[alpha].sub.z][f(z)] = [D.sup.[alpha].sub.z][f(z)] as in the classical RL operator of order [alpha] (or -[alpha]), Moreover when c [right arrow] [infinity] (1.1) may be identified with the familiar Weyl fractional derivative (or integral) of order [alpha] (or -[alpha]), An ordinary derivative corresponds to [alpha] = 1 with (1B) (d/dz)[f(z)] = [D.sup.[alpha].sub.z][f(z)], The binomial Leibnitz rule for derivatives is
It was Leibnitz who came to the idea of determinant and gave the first formalisation while solving systems of linear equations.
Despite its breadth, the Annotated Catalogue becomes maximally useful only when read in tandem with two other catalogues: the fourth volume of Karin Breitner and Thomas Leibnitz, Katalog der Sammlung Anthony Hoboken in der Musiksammlung der Osterreichischen Nationalbibliothek (Tutzing: Hans Schneider, 1986); and George W.
Other worthy pieces include Scott Breuninger's "Irish Clergy and the Deist Controversy: Two Episodes in the Early British Enlightenment," interesting for its account (among other things) of the way in which Anglican Bishop and philosopher George Berkeley responded to the deism of John Toland and Anthony Collins; and Eric Sean Nelson's "Leibnitz and China: Religion, Hermeneutics, and Enlightenment," which explores how Leibnitz juggled his deep Christian commitment with the curious openness, so frequently associated with the Enlightenment, to other cultures (in Leibnitz's case, Chinese).
Answer 4: A term coined by the 17th--century German philosopher and mathematician Gottfried Wilhelm Leibnitz. It refers to God's essential benevolence despite the existence of evil, which, Leibnitz said, God allowed to exist temporarily in the interests of the greater good in the "best of all possible worlds."