leisure class


Also found in: Wikipedia.

leisure class

a term coined by VEBLEN (The Theory of the Leisure Class, 1899) to refer to a particular stratum of the upper classes in the US in the latter half of the 19th-century Veblen was critical of the nouveaux riches, who expressed disdain for all forms of manual and productive labour and sustained their own status position through acts of CONSPICUOUS CONSUMPTION and abstention from work.
References in classic literature ?
To them conventional good breeding, fine manners, the pleasures of the leisure class, and the standards of 'The Town' (fashionable London society) were the only part of life much worth regarding.
A curious and amazing literature that served to make the working class utterly misapprehend the nature of the leisure class.
For all their evocations of Wall Street strivers and the lunching leisure class, Bimmers are visceral machines that beg to be flung into a country bend.
tweed became popular with British men during the 1850s when Prince Albert influenced the beginning of the Estate Tweed movement - gents of the leisure class commissioned tweeds for their staff to wear, so they were recognised as belonging to a particular estate.
With increasing urbanization and the emergence of a leisure class, upper-class women read novels and played the piano and sang madrigals, while an army of servants, organized in a hierarchy like the military, toiled away 'downstairs.
I thus argue that Mildred Pierce draws upon Thorstein Veblen's classic 1899 socio-economic text Theory of the Leisure Class.
That streak continues with "The Leisure Class," although this latest film has been spared any commercial pressures by premiering on HBO, which needn't worry about anyone specifically paying to see it.
The former were his leisure class who provided little in the way of productivity but instead spent their time and money on acquiring social status by spending and wastefully consuming.
Thorstein Veblen, the son of a wealthy Minnesota farming family, produced the most influential progressive critique of consumption in a series of books and articles, most notably the scholarly classic The Theory of the Leisure Class (1899).
Way back in 1899, when consumerism was barely a glimmer in advertisers' neurons, economist Thorstein Veblen asserted in his widely cited book The Theory of the Leisure Class that there exists a fundamental split in society between those who work and those who exploit the work of others; as societies evolve, the latter come to constitute a "leisure class" that engages in "conspicuous consumption.
Make no mistake, this is full-time work, not the life of the leisure class.
Usually they are wholesome men of the streets, like Inspector Lestrade in the Sherlock Holmes stories, physically and mentally able to deal with the usual run of pickpockets, pimps, and second-story men, but out of their depth when murder intrudes upon the pleasant life of the leisure class at Toppington Grange.