Lviv

(redirected from Lemberg)
Also found in: Dictionary, Wikipedia.

Lviv

Lviv (ləvēˈo͞o, ləvēfˈ), Rus. Lvov, Pol. Lwów, Ger. Lemberg, city (1989 pop. 791,000), capital of Lviv region, W Ukraine, at the watershed of the Western Bug and Dniester rivers and in the northern foothills of the Carpathian Mts. The chief city of W Ukraine, Lviv is a major rail and highway junction and an industrial and commercial center. Machine building, food processing, and the manufacture of chemicals and pharmaceuticals, motor vehicles, and textiles are the leading industries. Lviv is also an educational and cultural center, with a famous university (est. 1661) and several institutes of the Ukrainian Academy of Sciences. Landmarks include a 16th-century palace and two 14th-century cathedrals.

Founded c.1256 by Prince Daniel of Halych, the city was named for his son Lev and developed as a great commercial center on the trade route from Vienna to Kiev. It also served as an outpost against Tatar invasions. Lviv was captured by the Poles in the 1340s, the Turks in 1672, and the Swedes in 1704. During the first partition of Poland (1772) it passed to Austria, and became the capital of Galicia. Lviv was the chief center of the Ukrainian national movement in Galicia after 1848. The capital of the short-lived West Ukrainian Democratic Republic after World War I, the city was taken by Poland in 1919 and confirmed as Polish by the Soviet-Polish Treaty of Riga (1921). Lviv was annexed to Ukraine by the USSR in 1939. German forces held the city during much of World War II and exterminated the Jewish population; by the early 1990s the city's Jewish residents numbered about 17,000. In 1945, Poland formally ceded Lviv to the USSR, from which Ukraine declared its independence in 1991.

The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2022, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved.

Lviv

an industrial city in W Ukraine: it has belonged to Poland (1340--1772; 1919--39), Austria (1772--1918), Germany (1939--45), and the Soviet Union (1945--91); Ukrainian cultural centre, with a university (1661). Pop.: 719 000 (2005 est.)
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Lemberg has worked extensively in the public, private, and educational sectors, including 14 years with the U.S.
Entretanto, autores alertam que os transtornos alimentares cursam de forma distinta entre os generos, pois os homens idealizam uma forma corporal diferente, baseada em maior quantidade de massa muscular (Carvalho e colaboradores, 2016; Fortes e colaboradores, 2015; Stanford e Lemberg, 2012).
Let us go back four years, to July 31st, 1942, to Lemberg, the capital of Distrikt Galitzie, in the heart of Europe.
He writes, for instance, that "in Lviv, as in many other cities and places, the rapid annihilation of an ethnically targeted large share of its population was the deepest, most visible, and most dramatic change wrought by Lemberg's German occupation, whether immediately--or later--recognized as such or not." Moreover, he notes, "in Lviv, urban genocide began as a public spectacle," whereby "an estimated four thousand to eight thousand Jews were murdered in a pogrom that peaked on July 1," 1941, a pogrom "linking killing Jews in public with national purification " (94-95).
Officers elected by the chartering group to serve the chapter include President Richard Lemberg, President-elect Jim Sauerberg, Secretary Emily Hause, Treasurer David W.
Before World War I, the city was part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire and was known by the German name Lemberg. After Austria's defeat in 1918, it was part of the territory awarded to the newly created state of Poland and began to go by its Polish name, Lvov.
The Germans overran several Century outposts along the southwest-leading highway to Lemberg. One of these, occupied by a six-man detachment of the 399th's Company B, had been established inside a classical academy on the outskirts of Bitche.
Lemberg, "Development and assessment of a modified pediatric Crohn disease activity index," Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology & Nutrition, vol.
Lemberg, "Cone beam computed tomography in endodontics-a review," International Endodontic Journal, vol.
1943 Nazis liquidate Janowska concentration camp in Lemberg, western Ukraine, murdering at least 6000 Jews after a failed uprising and mass escape bid.
He was born in Lwow, Poland, then known as Lemberg (before 1918 so it was still part of the Austro-Hungarian empire) and now is part of the Ukraine and known as Lviv.