Ring-Tailed Lemur

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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Ring-Tailed Lemur

 

{Lemur catta), a lemuroid. The body is approximately 40 cm long; the tail, approximately 55 cm. The top of the body and head are gray; the underparts are whitish. There are 15-16 black rings on the tail. The male has a scent gland on its shoulder and a second one on its forearm, next to a double horny spur and a bundle of tactile hairs (vibrissae). The ring-tailed lemur lives in open areas in the southwestern part of the island of Madagascar; it is a good rock-climber. It is diurnal. Ring-tailed lemurs are found in groups of five to 20 individuals. They feed on figs, plantains, and other fruits. They are easily tamed and bear young in captivity.

REFERENCE

Zhizn’ zhivotnykh, vol. 6. Moscow, 1971.
The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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