Length Gauge

Length Gauge

 

a device for measuring distances by means of a measuring unit and a flexible line (usually steel wire). Length gauges are used in mine surveying work.

The main components of a length gauge are a measuring unit connected to a revolution counter, and pulleys that lead the wire into the measuring unit. Devices for tightening the wire and suspending it over the line being measured are also part of the gauge. Length gauges measure horizontal and sloping distances by the number of turns of the measuring unit as it moves along the wire, which is stretched between two points. A length gauge can measure distances up to 500 m with an average error not exceeding 1:10,000. Length gauges are made for measuring the depth of vertical mine shafts (up to 1,000 m). According to their principle of operation, length gauges are analogous to the mechanical depth gauges used in navigation.

References in periodicals archive ?
Using an overall length gauge, he measured the cartridge base to ogive for G&A's test RPR at 1.88 inches.
The surest and fastest way is to use a Hornady LNL Overall Length Gauge to check throat length.
Insert one of your ten bullets into the neck of the dummy casing attached to the front end of the overall length gauge. There is a collar on the shaft of the overall length gauge with a little knurled brass-colored nut on it.
Whenever I'm loading for single-shot pistols in some bottle-neck cartridge, Hornady's Lock-N-Load Comparator Set with 14 bullet inserts helps determine specific cartridge over-all length (C.O.A.L.) just like Frankford Arsenal's cartridge overall length gauge.
The distance from the instrument's both positions [l.sub.e] is fixed by using reference measure of length, for example, end length gauge (length standard).
In order to measure the pit depth we used the MT 2751 length gauge, from HEIDENHAIN.
The last tool, relating specifically to loading for accuracy, would be an overall length gauge to determine bullet seating depth as it relates to the rifling lands.
I prefer to again use a case length gauge. Gauges such as the RCBS Precision Mic come with two graduated caps--the first for determining headspace, the other for determining bullet seating depth.
You can purchase a special case length gauge that has various cartridge designations marked on it, or you may simply use a caliper and refer to recommended case length in a loading manual.
The easiest way is to use the Stoney Point cartridge length gauge. This neat little gadget, combined with a set of calipers, tells you exactly where your bullet seating depth should be, in less than a minute.
Force at break (in Newtons) was recorded from digital output, and benchmark separation at break was measured by length gauge and recorded.