Lense-Thirring effect

Lense-Thirring effect

[′len·zə ′tir·iŋ i‚fekt]
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Iorio, "An assessment of the systematic uncertainty in present and future tests of the lense-thirring effect with satellite laser ranging," Space Science Reviews, vol.
In writing [[??].sub.rel] this way, we in fact parameterize the general relativistic prediction with [mu] and assume that the error is contained in this empirical parameter (in fact, this equals to admit no apriori knowledge on the amplitude of Lense-Thirring effect), so
The 1st two terms are the Euler 3-space acceleration, the 2nd term explains the Lense-Thirring effect when the vorticity is non-zero, and the last term explains the precession of planetary orbits.
Pavlis (Joint Center for Earth Systems Technology, Maryland) announce the first reasonably accurate measurement of frame dragging (also known as the Lense-Thirring effect, for the two Austrian physicists who predicted it in 1918).
where [v.sub.R] is the velocity of the wave packet relative to the local 3-space, and where [v.sub.0] and [r.sub.0] are the velocity and position relative to the observer, and the last term in (6) generates the Lense-Thirring effect as a vorticity driven effect.
Nonlinear gravitodynamics: The Lense-Thirring effect. A documentary introduction to current research.
is the velocity of the wave packet relative to the 3-space, where [v.sub.0] and [r.sub.0] are the velocity and position relative to the observer, and the last term in (14) generates the Lense-Thirring effect as a vorticity driven effect.
Here we consider one difference between the two theories, namely that associated with the vorticity part of (18), leading to the "frame-dragging" or Lense-Thirring effect. In GR the vorticity field is known as the "gravitomagnetic" field B = -c [omega].