Lense-Thirring effect

Lense-Thirring effect

[′len·zə ′tir·iŋ i‚fekt]
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Together with colleagues, Ingram published a paper in 2009 suggesting that the QPO is driven by this Lense-Thirring effect, when the flat disc of matter surrounding a black hole, known as an accretion disc spirals inwards towards the black hole.
This meant we were directly measuring the motion of matter in a strong gravitational field near to a black hole the first time that the Lense-Thirring effect has been measured in a strong gravitational field.
The 1st two terms are the Euler 3-space acceleration, the 2nd term explains the Lense-Thirring effect when the vorticity is non-zero, and the last term explains the precession of planetary orbits.
Pavlis (Joint Center for Earth Systems Technology, Maryland) announce the first reasonably accurate measurement of frame dragging (also known as the Lense-Thirring effect, for the two Austrian physicists who predicted it in 1918).
In 2004, NASA launched Gravity Probe B to measure this so-called Lense-Thirring effect around Earth.
This is the first time that the Lense-Thirring effect has been measured in a strong gravitational field.
0] are the velocity and position relative to the observer, and the last term in (6) generates the Lense-Thirring effect as a vorticity driven effect.
Nonlinear gravitodynamics: The Lense-Thirring effect.
Such precessions are predicted by General Relativity (GR), and one component of this precession is the "frame-dragging" or Lense-Thirring effect, which is caused by the rotation of the Earth.
Such a precession is predicted by the Einstein theory of gravity, General Relativity (GR), with two components (i) a geodetic precession, and (ii) a "frame-dragging" precession known as the Lense-Thirring effect.