Leo VI


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Leo VI

(Leo the Wise or Leo the Philosopher), 862?–912, Byzantine emperor (886–912), son and successor of Basil I. He added to the work of his father by the publication (887–93) of the Basilica, a modernization of the law of Justinian I and of canon law. Leo attempted to end the schism which had been provoked by the patriarch PhotiusPhotius
, c.820–892?, Greek churchman and theologian, patriarch of Constantinople, b. Constantinople. He came of a noble Byzantine family. Photius was one of the most learned men of his time, a professor in the university at Constantinople and, under Byzantine Emperor
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, but the quarrel was renewed (906), partly over the issue of Leo's fourth marriage. During his reign, Leo was forced to pay tribute to the Bulgars after his defeat in 896. The Arabs completed the conquest of Sicily by taking Taormina in 902. They then sacked Salonica (906), and advanced in Asia Minor. Among Leo's edicts are the Tactics, for the army and navy, and the Book of the Prefect, on the duties of that officer, including his jurisdiction over the guilds of Constantinople. Leo was succeeded by his brother Alexander (reigned 912–13) and by his son Constantine VII.
References in periodicals archive ?
At this time, there was a plot to oppose Emperor Leo VI by Andronicus, supported by his son Constantine and an aristocrat Eustace.
Luttwak even obtains advanced access to George's upcoming Taktika from Leo VI, which he then incorporates wonderfully in chapters 12 (After the Strategikon) and 13 (Leo VI and Naval Warfare).
233-246, wisdom performance on the Athenian stage, the ambiguous legacy of Black Athena, measured speech in Plato's Phaidros, Artemis and the origins of bucolic poetry, Roman cultural identity in Cicero's Pro Archia, ancient Greek authors in Byzantium as exemplified by the homilies of the Emperor Leo VI, and adventures of a femme fatale in Byzantine Constantinople and modern Athens.
It opens with a dark, meditative hymn to the Virgin Mary, attributed to Emperor Leo VI (886-912), and closes with a quiet, humble improvisation on the hymn, Pax in Nomine Domini