Leo VI


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Leo VI

(Leo the Wise or Leo the Philosopher), 862?–912, Byzantine emperor (886–912), son and successor of Basil I. He added to the work of his father by the publication (887–93) of the Basilica, a modernization of the law of Justinian I and of canon law. Leo attempted to end the schism which had been provoked by the patriarch PhotiusPhotius
, c.820–892?, Greek churchman and theologian, patriarch of Constantinople, b. Constantinople. He came of a noble Byzantine family. Photius was one of the most learned men of his time, a professor in the university at Constantinople and, under Byzantine Emperor
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, but the quarrel was renewed (906), partly over the issue of Leo's fourth marriage. During his reign, Leo was forced to pay tribute to the Bulgars after his defeat in 896. The Arabs completed the conquest of Sicily by taking Taormina in 902. They then sacked Salonica (906), and advanced in Asia Minor. Among Leo's edicts are the Tactics, for the army and navy, and the Book of the Prefect, on the duties of that officer, including his jurisdiction over the guilds of Constantinople. Leo was succeeded by his brother Alexander (reigned 912–13) and by his son Constantine VII.
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Shared or copied methods and tactics of naval engagement (according to contemporary treatises such as the Greek Taktika and the Naumachika of Emperor Leo VI [r.
The second covers the reign of Basil I (867-886), and the third begins with Leo VI (886-912) and continues to Romanus II (959-963), in whose reign the text breaks off in AD 961 with the loss of a final folio at the end of the manuscript.
Even as far back as the 10th century, it was noted that blood sausage, poorly prepared, could carry some type of poison and Emperor Leo VI of Byzantium (886-911) actually banned it by law, with drastic penalties for preparing it.
At this time, there was a plot to oppose Emperor Leo VI by Andronicus, supported by his son Constantine and an aristocrat Eustace.
and the legislation of Leo VI the Wise (9th-10th a.
1999) "Theodora Antonopoulou, The Homilies of the Emperor Leo VI (The Medieval Mediterrean, Peoples, Economies and Cultures 14).
Luttwak even obtains advanced access to George's upcoming Taktika from Leo VI, which he then incorporates wonderfully in chapters 12 (After the Strategikon) and 13 (Leo VI and Naval Warfare).
233-246, wisdom performance on the Athenian stage, the ambiguous legacy of Black Athena, measured speech in Plato's Phaidros, Artemis and the origins of bucolic poetry, Roman cultural identity in Cicero's Pro Archia, ancient Greek authors in Byzantium as exemplified by the homilies of the Emperor Leo VI, and adventures of a femme fatale in Byzantine Constantinople and modern Athens.
It opens with a dark, meditative hymn to the Virgin Mary, attributed to Emperor Leo VI (886-912), and closes with a quiet, humble improvisation on the hymn, Pax in Nomine Domini
There are syncretic sarcophagi from Gaul, and then, among others, the chalice and paten of Gourdon, the Conques reliquary, the Chelles chasuble and a liturgical sandal, silverware from St Ninian's Isle, the Torredonjimeno treasure, the Abbey of Saint Maurice's spell-binding 'Casket of Theodoric' (which, till now, 'had not left its home for fourteen centuries'--Aillagon 2008: 52), the casket from Samagher in Croatia, a marble font (Torcello Museum, Venice), and a great bronze cross from Ravenna, while the pious crystal crown of Emperor Leo VI is there to remind us of Byzantium.
In 928, she had John X killed for trying to slip out from under her thumb, and put Leo VI in as a puppet.
The eleven Heothina, linked to the cycle of eleven Resurrection Gospel texts read on Sundays, are attributed to the Emperor Leo VI, while the eleven Sunday Exaposteilaria are usually attributed to his son, Constantine VII; but whereas the Heothina are found in practically all copies of the medieval Sticherarion as part of the 'Standard Abridged Version' of it, the Exaposteilaria are almost unknown in medieval musical sources.