Leo Von Klenze


Also found in: Wikipedia.

Klenze, Leo Von

 

Born Feb. 29, 1784, in Schladen, in present-day Lower Saxony, in the Federal Republic of Germany; died Jan. 27, 1864, in Munich. German architect.

Klenze, who studied in Germany, France, and Italy, was the court architect for Jérôme Bonaparte in Kassel from 1808 to 1813. Beginning in 1815 he held a similar position in the court of the Bavarian king Ludwig I in Munich. His public buildings in Munich (from 1816) and Athens (1839–51) are distinguished by a stately and austere regularity. In his massive and imposing buildings, such as the Glyptothek (1816–30, Munich), the Old Pinakothek (1826–36, Munich), and the New Hermitage (1839–52, Leningrad), Klenze combined various motifs from ancient Greek architecture, reproducing them with punctilious accuracy and coldness.

REFERENCE

Hederer, O. Leo von Klenze. Munich, 1964.
References in periodicals archive ?
It covers 1.4 sq miles (3.63km2) and has plenty of interesting features within its boundaries, including a Japanese teahouse and a Greek-style Monopteros temple created by Leo von Klenze.
As expected, Otto of Bavaria, the designated first king of Greece (1832-62), as well as the architects Karl Friedrich Schinkel and Leo von Klenze featured prominently in the implementation of this ideology.
Cockerell and Leo von Klenze who reconstructed the archaeology convincingly in three dimensions by drawing and painting the Acropolis as it might have looked two and a half millennia earlier.
Opening this act was a group of paintings by the Nazarenes, that brotherhood of mostly Catholic artists who, between 1809 and 1829, advocated a "patriotic and religious" art, here labeled "Political Primitivism." In another gallery, a wall of Romantic cathedrals (by Caspar David Friedrich, Johann Anton Ramboux, etc.) went head-to-head with a wall of Greek temples (by Friedrich, Leo von Klenze, etc.), all brought together under the title "The Cathedral, Between Reverie and Political Utopia." The retroactive use of the conceptual dyad elaborated by Nietzsche was shown to be inadequate: Was one to understand Friedrich's Greek temples as "Apollonian" and his cathedrals as "Dionysian," or perhaps the other way around?
This area combines several of the most important galleries in Europe, most significantly the Alte Pinakothek (Old Art Gallery), a magnificent work of neo-classicism by Leo von Klenze, inaugurated in 1836.
It covers 1.4 sq miles (3.63km2) and has plenty of interesting features within its boundaries, including a Japanese teahouse and a Greek-style Monopteros temple created by Leo von Klenze. For the more adventurous visitor, a stream running through the garden has a standing wave and people are invited to surf.
So you almost don't need the Kabakovs, but rather to simply see the [Hermitage] installations as found objects." Chris Dercon reminded the audience that the practice of architects taking part in curatorial endeavors is in fact part of the history of the Hermitage--as Leo von Klenze, the museum's original architect, did the same.
We realise that they came into being as the result of a forward-looking desire to give the city an artistic character, to make it, in fact, an aesthete's paradise.' Many of these buildings were by Leo von Klenze, the principal architect employed by Ludwig I, the Wittelsbach aesthete monarch who did most to make Munich not only modern but also conspicuous as a city of the arts in the first half of the century.
These include a Japanese teahouse and a Greek-style Monopteros temple created by Leo von Klenze. For the more adventurous visitor, a stream that runs through the garden has a standing wave and people are invited to surf here.