Lepidodendron


Also found in: Dictionary, Medical, Wikipedia.
Related to Lepidodendron: Sigillaria
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Lepidodendron

 

a genus of fossil arborescent lycopods (club mosses). Lepidodendrons existed during the Carboniferous and Permian periods in the tropical zone (for example, the Euramerican paleobotanical region). These plants had a straight trunk that branched dichotomously in the upper part; the trunk measured up to 20–30 m tall and had a diameter of up to 2 m at its base. The trunk consisted of wood and a thick bark that was covered with spiral rows of cushions. The cushions varied in shape from fusiform to rhombic or rounded-elliptic. The upper half of each cushion has a scar from a fallen leaf; over the scar is a pit that enclosed a ligule, whose function is not clear. In contrast to the bark of modern plants, the bark of Lepidodendron was not shed as the trunk grew but increased in thickness. In order to facilitate transpiration in a hot and humid climate, the bark was equipped with strands of air-bearing tissue. Below the level of the soil the trunk of Lepidodendron branched dichotomously, forming rhizophores (stigmariae), from which delicate roots emerged. The leaves, which bore sporangia (sporophylls), were gathered into large, heterosporous cones.

V. A. VAKHRAMEEV

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The two fossil genera of lycopsids (Lepidodendron and Lepidophloios) had an ecological preference for the most waterlogged and stable (i.e., undisturbed) parts of peat-forming mires or clastic swamps (Phillips and DiMichele 1992; DiMichele and Phillips 1994).
Further work has clearly shown that similar large scars are borne by some typical Lepidodendron stems, e.g.
Botkrodendron minutifolium has small shoots that resemble those of Lepidodendron in possessing small leaf cushions.
nov., a pseudoherbaceous segregate of Lepidodendron (Pennsylvanian): Phylogenetic context for evolutionary changes in lycopsid growth architecture.
argyrosperma Lepidodendron, Stem Reduced height Hizemodendron (both fossils) Lyginopteridopsida, Leaf Simple, entire Magnoliales Pseudopanax crassifolius Leaf Increased length, mature leaves, decreased width Juvenile leaves Paedomorphosis [a] Ancestor, descendant Neot.
Description of an upright Lepidodendron with Stigmaria roots in the roof of the Sydney Main Coal in the island of Cape Breton.
Lycopsid remains are very rare indeed, represented only by leaf compressions (Cyperites sp.) at 220 m in the measured section, and at 241 m, by trunk compressions (Lepidodendron sensu latu and Sigillaria cf.