lese majesty

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lese majesty

or

leze majesty

(both: lēz mă`jĭstē) [Fr. lèse majesté, Lat. laesae maiestatis (crimen)=(crime of) violating majesty], offense against the dignity of the sovereign of a state or of a state itself. The offense as such first appeared in Rome, though not defined with great exactness. Lese majesty seems to have been considered originally as a violation of the fundamental laws of the Roman state, a crime against the Roman people. When the Roman Empire replaced the republic, the crime became an offense against the person of the emperor, but it still included cases that were more generally designated treason; all attempts to upset the state, as well as actions or words derogatory to, or dangerous to, the state were interpreted as offenses against the sovereign's person. This personality cult became the main element in the term lese majesty, which in time was applied especially to physical or verbal attack on the sovereign. The legislation against the crime passed into Germanic law, and feudal law heightened the personalization of the concept because of the personal nature of the feudal bond. In most modern states the specific crime of lese majesty is confounded with, and included in, the crime of treasontreason,
legal term for various acts of disloyalty. The English law, first clearly stated in the Statute of Treasons (1350), originally distinguished high treason from petit (or petty) treason. Petit treason was the murder of one's lawful superior, e.g.
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. The decline of absolute monarchies hastened the disappearance of the crime, although it remained in German law until the fall of the German monarchy in 1918. While in some modern countries verbal or written attacks on the form of government, the head of the state, or public officials are made crimes analogous to lese majesty, in countries such as the United States that recognize the right to freedom of speech, the concept of lese majesty is severely restricted.
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References in periodicals archive ?
This case is an ugly reminder of the Thai authorities' increasing use of the lese majeste law as a tool of suppression.
David Streckfuss's chapter on lese majeste also merits careful reading.
The present reviewer was reminded of a sentence in Kierkegaard's Training in Christianity: `Only through the consciousness of sin is there entry to Christianity, and the wish to enter it by any other way is the crime of lese majeste'.
In places where Ion writes on the basis of secondary sources rather than primary sources, we occasionally find some questionable statements, for example, about the lese majeste incident of Uchimura Kanzo in 1891.
Why are they always committing lese majeste against the great queen Science?
Samphy's was the second high-profile lese majeste case last year, following the government's March 2018 amendment to the law which criminalised any 'word, gesture, writing, picture or other media which affects the dignity of the individual [the King]'.
Thailand has some of the harshest lese majeste laws in the world and the king's orders are considered final.
A Cambodian court jailed a man on Wednesday for three years for insulting the king in Facebook posts, the second known conviction under a new lese majeste law enacted last year, which rights groups fear could be used to stifle dissent.
Five days later, he would be charged with lese majeste and executed as an enemy of the state.
Each lese majeste offense carries up to 15 years in jail, Reuters noted, and affects how journalists can report news in Thailand.
10 on counts of lese majeste and violating the Computer Crime Act, to which he pleaded not guilty.
Summary: Al Basham was charged with lese majeste, blasphemy and disturbance of religious values and public order