Lesene

Lesene

Vertical strips resembling a pilaster, but without a base or capital; used to subdivide wall surfaces and domes into framed panels.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Lesene

 

(also pilaster-strip), in architecture, a vertical architectural member that projects from a wall and has no base or capital. Lesenes were used mainly in the Romanesque architecture of Western Europe (predominantly in France, Germany, and Lombardy) and in Russian medieval architecture. The use of lesenes was one of the principal means of rhythmically splitting up the expanse of a wall.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

pilaster strip, lesene

Same as pilaster mass but usually applied to slender piers of slight projection; in medieval architecture and derivatives, often joining an arched corbel table.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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In addition to the high student-to professor-ratio, the USC School of Law suffered from cramped classrooms due to growing enrollment (Lesene 2001, 68-70).
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O'Neal's initial introduction to printmaking was an undergraduate printmaking class at Howard University with master printmaker James Lesene Wells.
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