Lesser Black-Backed Gull


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Lesser Black-Backed Gull

 

(Larus fuscus), a bird of the family Laridae of the order Charadriiformes. It measures 51–58 cm long and weighs 620–780 g. The head, neck, under-parts, and tail are white, and the back and wings are dark bluish gray; the young birds are dark brown. The lesser black-backed gull is distributed in northern Europe; in the USSR it is found in the northwest, from the Kola Peninsula to the Baltic Region and Lake Onega. In the winter the birds migrate to the Black Sea. They nest in coastal cliffs and on small islands, frequently in colonies. Two or three eggs are laid at a time, which hatch after 24 days. The lesser black-backed gull feeds on fish, insects, marine invertebrates, berries, and, more rarely, on rodents.

References in periodicals archive ?
The lesser black-backed gull, Larus fuscus, in Greenland.
We experimentally increased the number of eggs laid by Lesser Black-backed Gulls and examined the relationship between egg number and egg quality.
Key words: lesser black-backed gull, Larus fuscus, Greenland, range expansion, North Atlantic
A LANDLOCKED Birmingham BT building has become home to a flock of unexpected visitors in the shape of hundreds of lesser black-backed gulls.
Unlike herring-gulls and lesser black-backed gulls, they don't harass or dive-bomb people, even if they have chicks or nests nearby.
Mr Rock, who has studied gulls since 1980, said that when he rings the legs of lesser black-backed gulls the clips say a***hole in Portuguese, "in hope that when they migrate people might find it".
The island is also a haven for wildlife, with Mr Sampson saying 3,600 nesting pairs of lesser black-backed gulls were counted there last year.
Home to a lighthouse, a colony of Cardiff council project workers and, more lyrically, leek and sea lavender, lesser black-backed gulls, and, as well as some terrifically special kind of marine grassland, Angius fragilis - a type of slow worm with unusual blue markings, that's found nowhere else in THE WORLD.
Bird biologist Peter Rock bases his claim on the long term investigation he has made of herring and lesser black-backed gulls in Bristol.
The toll also includes puffins, razorbills, gannets, great skuas and lesser black-backed gulls.
Unlike herring gulls and lesser black-backed gulls, they don't harass or dive-bomb people, even if they have chicks or nests nearby.