letter

(redirected from letterer)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Idioms, Wikipedia.

letter:

see alphabetalphabet
[Gr. alpha-beta, like Eng. ABC], system of writing, theoretically having a one-for-one relation between character (or letter) and phoneme (see phonetics). Few alphabets have achieved the ideal exactness.
..... Click the link for more information.
.
The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Letter

 

(1) A graphic sign, or type.

(2) a grapheme, or unit of an alphabet. In an ordinary text a letter signifies not a sound but a phoneme. More precisely, a letter segment of a written word may, in an ideal situation, coincide with a phonemic segment of the corresponding word when sounded. In actuality, however, such a coincidence almost never occurs. A letter may also not have a sound equivalent if it is used only in a certain graphic combination or in a digraph (a graphic symbol consisting of two letters); thus, in the German othography the letter q can only occur in the combination qu.

REFERENCES

Boduen-de-Kurtene, I. A. “Neskol’ko slov po povodu ’obshche-slavianskoi azbuki.’” Zhurnal Ministerstva narodnogo prosveshcheniia, 1871, no. 5, pp. 149-95.
Boduen-de-Kurtene, I. A. Ob otnoshenii russkogo pis’ma k russkomu iazyku. St. Petersburg, 1912.
Shcherba, L. V. “Teoriia russkogo pis’ma.” In his book Izbrannye raboty po russkomu iazyku. Moscow, 1957.
Gelb, I. J. Study of Writing. London, 1952.
The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

What does it mean when you dream about a letter?

Dreaming about receiving and reading a letter can indicate either our intuitions or our fantasies about what the sender thinks about us. We send letters in a dream when we want to tell someone something. A dream letter can also be an allusion to certain idioms, from doing something “to the letter” to receiving a rejection “Dear John letter.”

The Dream Encyclopedia, Second Edition © 2009 Visible Ink Press®. All rights reserved.

letter

[′led·ər]
(communications)
A character used in an alphabet generally representing one or more sounds of a spoken language.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Letter

(dreams)
Dreaming about receiving letters, just as in daily life, usually represents receiving news, information, or messages from someone specific, from your unconscious, or from the world at large. If you look forward to mail, this dream may have positive connotations for you. However, if you dread the envelopes that hold the monthly bills, then this dream may have negative and anxiety-provoking meaning. Typically, however, dreaming about receiving letters has positive and, at times, spiritual connotations. You may be coming into greater awareness about some aspect of your life, having new realizations, increasing your self-understanding, or getting to the truth of things that concern you. Some believe that seeing many unopened letters in your dreams may represent missed opportunities.
Bedside Dream Dictionary by Silvana Amar Copyright © 2007 by Skyhorse Publishing, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Robert Love, pencils; Robert Love and Dana Shukartsi, inks; Heather Breckel, Michelle Davies, Diego Simone, and Brennan Wagner, colors; Robert Love, Thomas Mauer, and David Walker, letterers. Dark Horse, 2013.
Engagingly written by Sean Taylor, superbly illustrated by the team of Flavio Hoffe and Esteve Polls, colored by Debora Carita, and with a superb staff of cover artists, letterers, and editors, "Dominatrix: You Want Me" first appeared as a mini-series of individual comics from IDW Publishing that has now been collected together into a magnificent graphic novel format that is highly recommended for mature readers.
In Evans's second essay, punningly titled "Our Types," she tells the story of typographic tradition and innovation in the Society of Printers, through the voices of the designers and letterers themselves.
"Utopia," by the way, was really supposed to be named "Uptopia," in reference to the Ryans' home town, but the letterers left the extra "P" out.
If the display appears half-empty or the fruit looks handled, they get the impression the fruit has been picked through, leaving them with the letterers. This is why it is critical to keep displays fully stocked, cleaned and culled throughout business hours.
Artists prepared sketches; lithographers transferred sketches to Bavarian lithographic stones; letterers wrote inscriptions on stone; and colorists hand-painted prints.
It discusses scholarship on the production of culture, particularly manga and other categories of trade book publishing, and the structure of the American manga publishing industry; the larger Japanese and American contexts of book publishing and the history of manga publishing in the US; the motivations behind the founding of manga publishing companies and the art of licensing; the laborers involved, such as translators, editors, and letterers; the new models of publishing, including fan-funded publishing, web aggregation, iPad/iPhone books, and locally produced original global manga titles; and how the intervention of the publishing industry creates a process of domestication that makes manga less Japanese and more American.
The author looks at the work of forty letterers, illustrators, and designers; the book includes interviews, images of their product designs, and process sketches.
At the time I'm writing this column, I have just voted for the 2015 Eisner Awards, and there are now three categories for youth: Best Publication for Early Readers (up to age seven), Best Publication for Kids (ages eight to twelve), and Best Publication for Teens (ages thirteen to seventeen); in addition, children's and teens' titles (and their creators) have been nominated in quite a few other categories--I count twenty-three titles that I consider to be specifically published for children and teens, and eight creators (writers, artists, colorists, letterers).
Ably assisted by a team of five talented artists, three letterers, two designers, two cover artists, and an editor, Shawn Granger's "Innocent" is a compelling story of an angel of retribution who befriends a psychopathic mortal.