Leucanthemum


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.
Related to Leucanthemum: Leucanthemum superbum

Leucanthemum

 

a genus of perennial herbs of the family Compositae. The alternate leaves are entire or, less frequently, pinnately lobed. The inflorescences are large solitary heads with imbricate involucres. The pistillate ray flowers are ligulate and white; the disk flowers are bisexual, tubular, and yellow. The fruit is an achene with longitudinal ribs. There are approximately 20 species of Leucanthemum, distributed in the temperate zone of Eurasia, primarily in the mountains of Central and Southern Europe. Of the three species found in the USSR, the most common is the daisy Leucanthemum vulgare. The other two species, L. rotundifolium and L. subalpinum, grow in the Carpathians. L. maximum, which is native to the Pyrenees, and L. vulgare, which has double-flowered garden forms, are often cultivated as ornamentals.

References in periodicals archive ?
("dalia"), Helianthus annuus ("girasol"), Leucanthemum vulgare Lam.
(vi) The Nagy-Nyilas meadow site is a shallow karstic depression within a large meadow complex with mosaics of short (Festuca rupicola, Brachypodium pinnatum) and tall (Bromus erectus, Arrhenaterum elatius, Calamagrostis arundinacea, etc.) grasses, lower forbs (Dianthus pontederae, Filipendula vulgaris, Leucanthemum vulgare, etc.), and scattered groups of oak, hornbeam, wild Sorbus, and lime (Tilia cordata).
Polyacetylenes from Chrysanthemum leucanthemum. Phytochemistry 14, 1027-1035.
Lepidium latifolium Leucanthemum vulgare Linaria vulgaris Lithophragma glabrum 0.3 [+ or -] 0.0 0.3 [+ or -] 0.0 Lithospermum ruderale Lomatium nudicaule 1.4 [+ or -] 0.3 Lomatium spp.
leucanthemum, grown under natural ambient conditions in greenhouse, were washed carefully in distilled water, then transferred to M and NS soils.
Leucanthemum x superbum is actually a hybrid between L.maximum and L.
The major constituents of the oil of Leucanthemum vulgare from Georgia include nerolidol, [alpha]-bisabolol, farnesol, and farnesene [36].
In her southeastern Pennsylvania garden, Nancy Ondra, author of the book Fallscaping, relies on long-blooming perennials like Shasta Daisy (Leucanthemum), Coreopsis (Coreopsis lanceolata) and perennial sages (e.g., Sage officinalis) that start flowering in summer and keep going into the fall and those like Asters (Asteraceae), Boltonias (Boltonia asteroides) and Joe-Pye weeds (Eupatorium purpurea) that rebloom in fall if you cut them back after their first round of summer flowers.
Over-sow a corner of your lawn with wildflowers, including moon daisy (Chrysanthemum leucanthemum), meadow clary (Salvia pratensis) and red campion (Silene dioica).
Examples include oxeye daisies (Leucanthemum vulgare), birdsfoot trefoil (Lotus corniculatus) and false-brome (Brachypodium sylvaticum).
'Becky' Shasta daisy (Leucanthemum 'Becky') won because of its bright white flowers, sturdy stems that resist lodging, and long season of bloom, in addition to its great performance across the country.
Plant species References Family Apiaceae Golden Alexanders (Zizia aurea) Robertson (1928) Family Asteraceae Yarrow (Achillea millefolium) Vaurie (1948) Ragweed (Ambrosia artermisiaefolia) Vaurie (1948) Ragweed (Ambrosia trifida) Girault (1907); Vaurie (1948); Wildermuth & Gates (1920) Burdock (Arctium mus) Vaurie (1948) Daisy (Leucanthemum sp.) Girault (1907; Vaurie (1948); Wildermuth & Gates (1920) Ox-eye daisy (Chrysanthemum Wildermuth & Gates (1920) leucanthemum) Thistle (Cnicus (=Cirsium) Vaurie (1948) altissimus) Canadian fleabane (Erigeron Vaurie (1948) canadense) Daisy fleabane (Erigeron ramosus Vaurie (1948) or E.