Levkas

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Levkás,

Greece: see LefkásLefkás,
formerly Levkás
or Leucas
, mountainous island (1991 pop. 19,350), c.115 sq mi (300 sq km), W Greece, in the Ionian Sea; one of the Ionian Islands. Lefkás (1991 pop.
..... Click the link for more information.
.
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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Levkas

 

(Leukas), an island in the Ionian Sea, part of the Ionian Islands; belongs to Greece. Area, 295 sq km. The low mountains, which reach an elevation of 1,158 m, are composed primarily of limestones; karst is developed. In the uncultivated areas, the vegetation contains a predominance of frigana (xerophytic shrub and semishrub vegetation) and maquis. Olives, citrus fruits, and grapes are grown. Levkas, one of the most important regions in Greece in olive production, has approximately 1 million olive trees. Fishing is also important. The principal city and port is Levkas.


Levkas

 

the name for the ground used in Russian medieval painting. After the 17th century the word levkas was used to designate the traditional ground for Russian icon painting: powdered chalk mixed with animal or fish glue. Levkas is also the name for the ground under the paint or gilt on wooden artifacts.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Nagy G (1996) Phaethon, Sappho's Phaon, and the white rock of Leukas: "reading" the symbols of Greek lyric.
In Greek mythology, Aphrodite jumps off the white rock of Leukas (what Percy calls Levkas) to relieve her passion for Adonis.
Immediately after narrating Chabrias's exploits, Diodoros relates that Timotheos "having sailed to Kephallenia brought over to his side the cities there and likewise persuaded those in Akarnania to incline toward Athens." (33) He then goes on to state that Timotheos also made friends of Alketas, king of the Molossians, and "won over the lands of the cities of those regions," (34) after which he won a naval battle against the Spartans near Leukas. Xenophon, apparently narrating the same campaign of 375, makes no mention of Kephallenia, Akarnania, or Molossia; instead, he states that Timotheos "having sailed around [the Peloponnese] straightaway put Corcyra under his control," (35) treating the island, however, in a moderate and humane way.
(7.) Green objects that Sappho threw herself off Leuctra not Leukas, that Arieka is not a Greek name, that Corinth was in ruins at the time of the novel, that the name of an actual priest of Apollo (since these are known) should have been used rather than a fictional one, and that Hittite is not identical with Linear A or B.