leukotriene

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leukotriene

[‚lü·kō′trī‚ēn]
(biochemistry)
Any of a family of oxidized metabolites of certain polyunsaturated fatty acids, predominantly arachidonic acid, that mediate responses in allergic reactions and inflammations, produced in specific cells upon stimulation.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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Therefore, leukotriene antagonists could interfere with cytokine function.
Huerva, "Oral leukotriene antagonists in thyroid eye disease: myth or reality?" Ophthalmic Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery, vol.
Harman, "Novel therapies in asthma: leukotriene antagonists, biologic agents, and beyond," American Journal of Therapeutics, vol.
Major Finding: Leukotriene antagonists showed equivalence with inhaled glucocorticoids as first-line therapy for asthma and with beta-agonists as add-on therapy for asthma at 2 months and at 2 years on several measures, but fell just short of demonstrating equivalence on the primary end point at 2 years.
Omalizumab was evaluated in a pivotal 52-week study of 627 children aged 6-11 years with moderate to severe persistent, inadequately controlled allergic asthma, despite treatment with fluticas-one at a dose of 200 mcg or more per day (or the equivalent), with or without other controller medications, which included short-acting beta-agonists (a mean of 2.8 puffs/day) and leukotriene antagonists (37%).
In children leukotriene antagonists may be used as monotherapy in those with milder symptoms and are especially effective in exercise-induced asthma.
Leukotriene antagonists like Singulair have become a common adjuvant along with inhaled steroids and slow-acting, long-duration bronchodilators in the management of asthma.
Leukotriene antagonists have been recommended on a trial basis with follow-up to evaluate the treatment response.
Furthermore, the antigen-induced effects in this model can be ameliorated with the current armamentarium of clinically available asthma medications, including glucocorticosteroids, [[beta].sub.2] adrenergic agents, and leukotriene antagonists (Abraham 2000).
In a systematic review comparing the use of inhaled glucocorticoids with leukotriene antagonists as monotherapy in the treatment of asthma, Ducharme (2003) concluded that leukotriene antagonists are less effective than inhaled glucocorticoids when used as a single agent in the treatment of asthma.
Data regarding the safety of leukotriene antagonists in pregnancy are extremely limited.