levee

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levee

(lĕv`ē) [Fr.,=raised], embankment built along a river to prevent flooding by high water. Levees are the oldest and the most extensively used method of floodflood,
inundation of land by the rise and overflow of a body of water. Floods occur most commonly when water from heavy rainfall, from melting ice and snow, or from a combination of these exceeds the carrying capacity of the river system, lake, or the like into which it runs.
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 control. They are constructed by piling earth on a surface that has been cleared of vegetation and leveled. From a broad base the levee narrows to a flat crown, on which sandbags or some other temporary protection may be placed to contain unusually high waters. Levee surfaces are commonly protected from erosion by vegetation, notably Bermuda grass. A banquette, or low terrace of earth, is usually added on the land side of high levees to prevent loss of material from the slope through rain erosion. On the river side, plantings of willows, weighted brush matting, or concrete revetments protect those sections of levee that are exposed to strong waves or currents, while ditches or drainage tiles keep the foundation from becoming waterlogged. Levee systems require careful planning, with sections set back from the river to form a wider channel and with flood valley basins divided by cross levees to prevent inundation of large areas by a single break. The most extensive levee systems in the United States are along the Mississippi and Sacramento rivers and their tributaries. The dikes of Holland are a form of levee, and levee-type embankments are used along the Danube, Vistula, Po, and other European rivers.

Levee

 

a hydraulic regulating structure, usually a low earthen dam, designed to protect riparian land from inundation during seasonal or flash flooding of rivers. Levees are built chiefly on the floodplains of rivers. They receive the pressure of the water only periodically, when the level rises above the banks.

levee

[′lev·ē]
(civil engineering)
A dike for confining a stream.
A pier along a river.
(geology)
An embankment bordering one or both sides of a sea channel or the low-gradient seaward part of a canyon or valley.
A low ridge sometimes deposited by a stream on its sides.

levee

1 US
an embankment alongside a river, produced naturally by sedimentation or constructed by man to prevent flooding

levee

2
1. a formal reception held by a sovereign just after rising from bed
2. (in Britain) a public court reception for men, held in the early afternoon
References in periodicals archive ?
The White House couldn't sort through conflicting reports about levee breaches and other developments, preventing rapid relief.
None of the changes made to the project, however, are believed to have had any role in the levee breaches recently experienced as the alternative design selected was expected to provide the same level of protection.
Although most of the levee breaches in coastal Louisiana were the result of the storm's surge flowing over levees, preliminary evidence suggests that three major breaches in downtown New Orleans occurred prior to the floodwalls being overtopped; that is, the floodwalls failed before their design was exceeded.
After the winds calmed, after the levee breached, after the city filled with water, they found a boat and began to look for ways to help.
Eight feet of flood water inundated everything in its path when the nearby London Street levee breached. Few children were lost, but on a daily basis, family, friends and cleanup crews are still finding grisly remains in attics, under stairs and in other places.
We know it's a critical problem, and just as we have looked at the potential for levee breaches, this storm has brought the HIV/AIDS population to our community in a similar way.
The canal's levee was the site of one of the major levee breaches. When Hurricane Rita hit just twenty days later, levee repairs were not complete and some areas began to flood again.
Currently, 16 counties are reporting damage from extremely heavy rainfall, both locally and upriver in the Arkansas River system, with multiple levee breaches across the state leaving hundreds of structures still at risk.
In Arkansas, the levee breached at Dardanelle, about 60 miles northwest of Little Rock.
The headline on the paper's Web site Friday morning read "River dropping after levee breaches." The report, by staff writer Rodney Hart, described it as "wait-and-see time for the Mississippi River communities[.]"
In his decision, Duval said the policies did not distinguish between floods caused by an act of God--such as excessive rainfall--and floods caused by an act of man, which would include the levee breaches following Katrina's landfall.