leviathan

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leviathan

(lēvī`əthən), in the Bible, aquatic monster, presumably the crocodile, the whale, or a dragon. It was a symbol of evil to be ultimately defeated by the power of good.
The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Leviathan

 

(1) In biblical mythology, an enormous sea monster resembling a giant crocodile. Figuratively, something huge and monstrous.

(2) The title of a work by the English philosopher T. Hobbes devoted to problems of the state.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

leviathan

sea monster; symbol of apocalypse. [Jew. Tradition: Leach, 67]

Leviathan

frighteningly powerful sea serpent. [O.T.: Job 41; Psalms 74:14; 104:26; Isaiah 27:1]
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

leviathan

Bible a monstrous beast, esp a sea monster
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
He recognizes that the distinction between negative and positive liberty marks the difference between classical liberalism and today's American "liberalism." But he does not recognize that the federal government did not need to grow into a Leviathan to impose the Bill of Rights on the states.
And again, he does not seem to understand that so much is invested in elections because the rewards are so high and Leviathan is so rich and powerful.
agriculture and labor," and that the "freeing" (he puts the term in quotation marks, perhaps not for the right reason) of finance led to the 2008-2009 recession, without even once mentioning Leviathan's housing policy.
Gerstle does not understand that a loving Leviathan is as dangerous as a warring one.
Perhaps because he honestly struggles with the consequences of a good Leviathan, Gerstle is not always consistent.
He rightly criticizes conservatives, who feed Leviathan with their own pet preferences for law-and-order, war-mongering, and surveillance.
In Gerstle's perspective, the solution to the paradox would be for citizens to come to terms with the necessary burden of Leviathan and enjoy life with the positive liberty that government gives them.
In his book The State (Liberty Fund, 1985, 1998), Anthony de Jasay developed a model of government that is more realistic than Gerstle's good Leviathan. The more the state intervenes, de Jasay argues, the more individuals will feel its burden, and the more they will ask for compensating privileges.
And he tends to assume d la Hobbes that Leviathan is necessary to protect liberty.
Leviathan revises that perception by suggesting that only through others can one gain access to the locked room of self.