Levin and Kitty

Levin and Kitty

long kept apart by her early refusal, their pride, and misunderstanding, they are eventually united. [Russ. Lit.: Tolstoy Anna Karenina]
References in periodicals archive ?
Andrew Wachtel suggests that Eikhenbaum too readily concludes that the epigraph applies only to Anna and Vronsky simply because it was included in earlier versions of the novel which did not yet contain Levin and Kitty. In addition, with the exception of Dostoevsky's Demons, Anna Karenina is the first major novel since the time of Pushkin to contain an epigraph, and Tolstoy, employing such a powerful statement, must have thoroughly considered its connection to the rest of the novel (Wachtel 111).
For Levin and Kitty, life became an increasing round of daily work and everyday routine, which they shared with each other.
The happy family is that formed by the marriage of Konstantine Levin and Kitty Shtcherbatskaya.