Lewis, Oscar

Lewis, Oscar,

1914–70, American anthropologist, b. New York City, grad. City College of New York (B.S.S., 1936) and Columbia (Ph.D., 1940). He was a professor of anthropology at Washington Univ. (St. Louis) from 1946 to 1948 and after that at the Univ. of Illinois. His theory of the culture of poverty holds that the poor in modern capitalist societies represent an identifiable culture that transcends national differences, and that the social and psychological consequences of poverty are severe and difficult to overcome. Much of his work describes the lives of poor Hispanics in the United States and Latin America. Among his works are Five Families (1959), The Children of Sánchez (1961), La Vida (1966), and Anthropological Essays (1970).
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Lewis, Oscar

(1914–70) anthropologist; born in New York City. He founded the anthropology department at the University of Illinois: Urbana (1948), where he spent his career. His powerful best-selling oral histories of Mexican villagers, Mexican and Puerto Rican slumdwellers, and the Cuban revolution led to his controversial theory of poverty as a transnational subculture and brought widespread public attention to the poor.
The Cambridge Dictionary of American Biography, by John S. Bowman. Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1995. Reproduced with permission.
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Cole's influences include John Lewis, Oscar Peterson, Teddy Wilson and Billy Eckstine.
Former heavyweight champion Vitali Klitschko, who also happens to be the Mayor of Kiev, has as company Lennox Lewis, Oscar de la Hoya, Sergio Martinez, Evander Holyfield, Roberto Duran, Marvin Hagler, Julio Cesar Chavez, Shawn Porter and Marco Antonio Barrera.
It is no ordinary occasion when Tom Jones sings the national anthem and boxing superstars like Lennox Lewis, Oscar De La Hoya and Bernard Hopkins all jostle for ringside seats to watch the action.
The American cable channel invested heavily in Hamed to elevate him among their boxing big-hitters alongside Lennox Lewis, Oscar De La Hoya and Roy Jones.