Lewis gun

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Lewis gun

[′lü·əs ‚gən]
(ordnance)
A gas-operated machine gun with a horizontal drum magazine, manufactured in several modifications; now obsolete.
References in periodicals archive ?
Manning the site's solitary Lewis machine gun was Lance Bombardier AA Hanson.
He grabbed a Lewis machine gun and poured a whole drum of bullets into the site, plastering the building with deadly accurate fire.
Charles Chandler, an early visionary and proponent of arming aircraft, fired a Lewis machine gun from between his legs while flying at about 500 feet onboard a Wright Model B biplane.
Then he took over command of the unit, rallied his men and stormed the German trenches, single-handedly killing 60 of the enemy with his Lewis machine gun.
Dyer marked himself in this action when he stormed several dug-in machine nests almost single-handedly while carrying a lone Lewis machine gun. Impressed by Dyer's actions, General Edmund Ironside, the commanding general of the Expeditionary Force, awarded the sergeant the Distinguished Conduct Medal and a field promotion to lieutenant.
Running towards it, he fired his Lewis machine gun at the Germans but it jammed.
RIFLE GRENADE LEWIS MACHINE GUN DESIGNED in the United States in 1911 by US Army Colonel Isaac Newton Lewis (and based upon an earlier overly-complex design by Samuel McLean), the Lewis gun comprised an early light machine gun widely adopted by British and Empire forces from 1915 onwards.
With the stock market being so shaky, early in 2010 she said to me, "If I cash in some of those stocks would you invest the money in another machine gun?" (How I love that woman!) What I located at the Ohio Ordnance Works was a Japanese manufactured Lewis Machine Gun. The Japanese Imperial Navy was licensed to manufacture these by the British starting in 1932 and they were used both on aircraft and by their Special Naval Landing Forces (Naval Infantry) throughout WWII.
The only war artefact I had at the time was a Thornton Picard, Lewis machine gun camera.
The prosecution claims veterinary surgeon and qualified pilot Kirk - known as the Flying Vet - sold a working Lewis machine gun to a collector for mounting on a World War I De Havilland 2 fighter plane.
Qualified pilot Maurice Kirk - a plane enthusiast known as the Flying Vet - advertised the working Lewis machine gun for sale for pounds 2,000.