Lexicalization


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Lexicalization

 

the transformation of certain language elements or combinations of them into vocabulary units—lexemes or phraseological combinations.

Lexicalization of syntactic combinations supplements the phraseology of a national language; the meaning of words entering into a phraseologism changes completely or partially (Russian derzhat’ kamen ’za pazukhoi, “to harbor a grudge,” literally, “to keep a stone in one’s bosom”). In some instances the lexicalization of word combinations is a word-formative process, the result of which is concretions (plashch-palatka, “waterproof cape”), abbreviations (vuz for vysshee uchebnoe zavedenie, “institution of higher education,” and mestkom for mestnyi komitet, “local trade union committee”), and adverbs such as smolodu (”from one’s youth”) and podelom (”it serves [him] right”).

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Table 3 Mean errors (percentages) and standard deviations for the three-letter items in Expt 1 according to type of item (word, nonword), N (high, low) and reader group (more-, less-skilled), and lexicalization errors as a percentage of errors made Type of item Words Reader group High-N Low-N Less-skilled (R.A.
This discursive syntax consists in the arbitrary jump from a rhetorization of syntax to a lexicalization of syntax, in the confusion of a dynamic process of spatialization with a static visible or mappable space.
specifically to compounding, but also to lexicalization (Bauer 1983: 58; Giegerich 2004; 2005).
Lexicalization and multiword expressions in the Basque WordNet.
Lexicalization is the reverse process, though in some contexts the word has a different meaning entirely.
Given this background, in this article I assess the productivity of the Old English verbal suffix--laecan and advance an explanation for the productivity of the affix based on a previous analysis of the class status of laecan/-laecan and the lexicalization of the derivatives to which it is attached.
With reanalysis, this can be seen on rare occasions to be happening in reverse through the process of "lexicalization".
The originality of this book is that it provides an exhaustive analysis of the grammaticalization and lexicalization phenomena that apply to Italian clitic pronouns, particularly ne, ci and la, in verbs that have been labeled verbi procomplementari by De Mauro (1999-2000), such as volerci 'be necessary, to take, intrans.', andarsene 'go, leave', and farcela 'manage, succeed' (to give just a few examples).