Lexington and Concord


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Related to Lexington and Concord: Declaration of Independence, Bunker Hill, Intolerable Acts

Lexington and Concord

 

cities in the state of Massachusetts, USA, near which the first battles of the American War of Independence (1775–83) took place on Apr. 19, 1775.

A 2,000-man detachment of British forces under Lieutenant-Colonel F. Smith left Boston for Concord (30 km to the north-west) with the aim of capturing a store of arms from the rebellious American colonists. During the march, the British troops were attacked on the road between Lexington and Con-cord by the colonists. The colonists were in loose order and fired from behind cover. The British detachment lost about 300 men and succeeded in returning to Boston only with the help of reinforcements. The Americans lost 100 men out of 400. The battles showed the advantage of using riflemen in loose order against infantry in linear battle formation.

References in periodicals archive ?
The classic accounts of this turning-point in American history by Allen French, The Day of Concord and Lexington (1925), and Arthur Tourtellot, Lexington and Concord (1959), focus tightly on the events of a single day.
When a suitable resolution to those grievances could not be reached, and a year later armed conflict had started at Lexington and Concord, drastic action was the result.
The first battles in this war were fought in the area of Lexington and Concord, near Boston, Massachusetts, on April 19, 1775.
The first shots of the American Revolution are fired in the Battles of Lexington and Concord, in Massachusetts.
Independence from England had already been secured in parts of the country by grassroots rebellion a year before the battles at Lexington and Concord that initiated hostilities with Britain.
Principal battles: Lexington and Concord (1775); Long Island (1776); Newport (Rhode Island) (1778).
This book provides a straightforward analysis of a much-ignored chapter in the history of the American Revolution: namely, the widespread and popular anti-British protests manifested in rural Massachusetts during the crucial twelve months that preceded the skirmishes at Lexington and Concord. Ray Raphael, an author who has already written several fine history books, including a social analysis of the American Revolution, contends that the armed confrontation on Lexington Green was the end result of a complicated process of political rebellion in rural parts of the colony outside Boston, instead of a start for the rebellion that flowed from the major port city.
The Revolutionary War begins when British soldiers and American patriots clash at Lexington and Concord, Massachusetts.
The clashes at Lexington and Concord began the war for American independence, even though a formal declaration would not be made for more than a year.
Nearly eight months before the American War of Independence began with the battles of Lexington and Concord, 4,622 militiamen from 37 towns of Worcester County marched down Main Street in Worcester, shut down the Crown-controlled county courthouse and, for the first time ever in the American colonies, effectively overthrew British authority.
After the Battles of Lexington and Concord, Massachusetts' pro-British military Governor Thomas Gage wrote to Connecticut Governor Jonathan Trumbull seeking assistance against the patriots.