Li Ang


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Li Ang

(lē äng), pseud. of

Shih Shu-tuan

(shûr sho͞o-dwän), 1952–, Taiwanese writer. After graduating from college in Taiwan she studied drama in the United States in the 1970s. Her fiction, which includes the novella The Butcher's Wife (1983, tr. 1986) and a later edition of the novella together with short stories (tr. 1995), is critical of traditional Chinese culture and controversial for its portrayal of cultural superstition, violence, and brutally abusive sexuality. Most of her works have not yet been translated into English.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The Butchers Wife by Li Ang is widely viewed as a modern classic.
An interesting mix of authors--Mishima Yukio and Murakami Haruki; Li Ang and Zhu Tianwen--pairing writers of diverse writerly temperament and opposing political stances, makes for intriguing comparisons.
of Maryland and George Mason U.) examines the cultural production of four contemporary controversial women authors--Maxine Hong Kingston, Wei Hui, Li Ang, and Li Bihua--in different global Chinese locations.
Taiwanese writer and veteran feminist Li Ang was refused entry to Afghanistan because she did not have a 'Non Objection Certificate' (NOC) from China, reports said Thursday.
This rendition should bolster Shih Shu-ching's reputation as a social raconteur following in the footsteps of Eileen Chang, Wang Anyi, and Shih's sister, Li Ang.
The story won for Li Ang the first prize in a Taiwan newspaper's fiction contest, as well as critical acclaim, controversy, even notoriety.