Liberius


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Liberius

(lībēr`ēəs), d. 366, pope (352–66), a Roman; successor of St. Julius I. At the beginning of his pontificate, the status of AthanasiusAthanasius, Saint
, c.297–373, patriarch of Alexandria (328–73), Doctor of the Church, great champion of orthodoxy during the Arian crisis of the 4th cent. (see Arianism).
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 was still disputed, and Liberius requested Emperor Constantius IIConstantius II,
317–61, Roman emperor, son of Constantine I. When the empire was divided (337) at the death of Constantine, Constantius II was given rule over Asia Minor, Syria, and Egypt, while his brothers, Constans I and Constantine II, received other portions.
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 to call the Council of Arles (353). Subdued by imperial favor toward ArianismArianism
, Christian heresy founded by Arius in the 4th cent. It was one of the most widespread and divisive heresies in the history of Christianity. As a priest in Alexandria, Arius taught (c.
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, the papal legates signed against Athanasius, but Liberius refused to be coerced or bribed. He was banished to Thrace by Constantius, who set up an antipope, FelixFelix,
Roman deacon, antipope (355–56). Emperor Constantius II, an Arian, set him up to replace Liberius. He is wrongly known as Felix II.
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. In 358, Liberius was permitted to return to Rome after signing a vaguely worded creed and repudiating communion with Athanasius. Felix was forced to retire. After Constantius died, Liberius openly avowed his orthodox position and reasserted the primacy of Rome as arbiter in matters of faith.
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References in classic literature ?
And therefore, when great ones in their own particular motion, move violently, and, as Tacitus expresseth it well, liberius quam ut imperantium meminissent; it is a sign the orbs are out of frame.
Pope Liberius built a church on the site of the snow fall in the Esquiline Hill, which was later enlarged and consecrated by Pope Sixtus III in 435.
3,200 relay: Lake Zurich (Burk, Baffa, Loftus, Burns), 9:32.05; 400 relay: Highland Park (King, Van Den Akker, Liberius, Gilling) 48.96; 3,200: Giron (Round Lake) 10:35.74; 100 high hurdles: Polka (Grant), 15.78; 100: Gilling (Highland Park) 12.15; 800: Schmitt (Lakes) 2:15.24; 800 relay: Warren (Vaughn, Glickley, Randolph, Harris) 1:47.92; 400: Jenkins (Warren) 57.85; 300 int.
Rhetoricam in eo vincit, quod tropis liberius utitur, et ad eam
Cuarenta veces encontramos el adverbio libere (formas: libere, liberius).
Peter O'Toole plays palace orator Gallus while Steven Berkoff is Liberius, Joss Ackland plays Rufus and Edward Fox takes on the role of Emperor Constantine.
We reiterate that it is doubtful whether the three patristic examples of Popes Liberius, Vigilius and Honorius are cases of heresy.
Saint Marcellinus (296-304), Liberius (352-366), and John XVIII (1004-1009) all resigned.
Some historians believe that Pope Macellinus (308) and Pope Liberius (366) also abdicated, and Pope John XVIII (1009) is believed to have stepped down and retired to a monastery.
No limitarse a la racionalidad, hablar "con mas ornato y digresiones que lo que exigia la pura verdad" (ornatius aut liberius quam simplex ratio ueritatis) (De or.