chlordiazepoxide hydrochloride

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chlordiazepoxide hydrochloride

[¦klȯr·dī‚az·ə′pak‚sīd ‚hī·drə′klȯr‚īd]
(pharmacology)
C16H14ON3Cl A white crystalline conpound, soluble in water; the hydrochloride salt is used as a tranquilizer.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Switch to Librium (chlor-diazepoxide) or phenobarbital in an outpatient setting at a time when patients are physiologically improved.
Librium is a prescribed substance that is given to those who are overcoming alcohol detoxification, and is used to reduce seizures.
After the major success of: Miltown, the new class of tranquilizers, benzodiazepines (marketed as Librium and Valium), also helped to expand the tranquilizer market.
Two-thirds of all tranquilizers, such as diazepam (Valium), chlordiazepoxide (Librium) and alprazolam (Xanax), are prescribed to women.
paracoxib is not mentioned, chloral hydrate is included as is chlordiazepoxoide (Librium).
Auden's famous characterization of this era as the "Age of Anxiety." Using historical records, Tone looks at how Hollywood culture and the popular press glamorized Miltown, "the fashionable pill." The book then follows the development of subsequent medications such as Valium and Librium, exploring issues such as gender differences in medication use, the marketing of these medications, shifting public attitudes toward tranquilizer use during the 1960s and '70s, and the public and political backlash against tranquilizers as their dangerous addictive potential became more widely recognized.
Other drugs known to leach DEHP from PVC tubing are: Etoposide (VePesid), Teniposide (Vumon), Librium, Monistat, Sandimmune, Tacrolimus, Fat Emulsions and Vitamin A.
In 1960, Hoffman-LaRoche (aka Roche) produced Librium. Not a "me too" drug, Librium was chemically different: benzodiazepine.
Mom lived on Milltown and Librium for the better part of the Kennedy administration, and while Jackie's pillbox hats absorbed a nation, Mom's pillboxes spilled over the kitchen table.
Food and Drug Administration warned the public about "Brazilian diet pills" containing active ingredients of Prozac, Librium and fluxetine HCI, an antidepressant used to treat panic disorder, bulimia and obsessive-compulsive disorder.
After these drugs were demonized, DeGrandpre notes, psychoactive pharmaceuticals such as meprobramate (Miltown), amphetamines (Benzedrine, Dexedrine, Methedrine), barbiturates (Ambutal, Nembutal, Seconal), methaqualone (Quaalude), and the benzodiazepines (Librium, Valium, Xanax, Ativan, Halcion) followed "the same cycle of medical hype, vast nonmedical use, and new and 'unexpected' problems of dependency." DeGrandpre argues that SSRI antidepressants such as Prozac are undergoing a similar re-examination.
In the early days, I prescribed imipramine for the panic and a benzodiazepine such as Librium (chlordiazepoxide) or Valium (diazepam) for 2-3 weeks to help patients cope with the anticipatory anxiety that occurred before the imipramine became effective.