chlordiazepoxide hydrochloride

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chlordiazepoxide hydrochloride

[¦klȯr·dī‚az·ə′pak‚sīd ‚hī·drə′klȯr‚īd]
(pharmacology)
C16H14ON3Cl A white crystalline conpound, soluble in water; the hydrochloride salt is used as a tranquilizer.
References in periodicals archive ?
Switch to Librium (chlor-diazepoxide) or phenobarbital in an outpatient setting at a time when patients are physiologically improved.
Librium is a prescribed substance that is given to those who are overcoming alcohol detoxification, and is used to reduce seizures.
In addition, she incorporates oral, history interviews with two pharmaceutical innovators, Frank Berger (who discovered Miltown) and Leo Sternbach (who discovered Librium and Valium).
In The Age of Anxiety, Tone discusses research published as early as 1961 that documented the potentially serious withdrawal reactions that could occur with medications such as Librium and Valium.
In the early days, I prescribed imipramine for the panic and a benzodiazepine such as Librium (chlordiazepoxide) or Valium (diazepam) for 2-3 weeks to help patients cope with the anticipatory anxiety that occurred before the imipramine became effective.
the taper of Librium, a medication that mimicked the effects of alcohol in a safe, controllable way; the Alcoholics Anonymous recommendation; the clinic appointment for follow-up that was never kept.
Williams ordered a dose of 25 mg Librium to ease the effects of withdrawal.
By the mid 1970s, a decade after its introduction to the drugs market, Valium, or Diazepam, had replaced Librium as the most commonly prescribed tranquilizer.
Such people account for a high proportion of the consumption of minor tranquillizers like Librium and Valium.
In the 1960s, owner Arthur Sackler, a physician and pioneer in direct-to-consumer advertising, helped create the marketing buzz for Librium and Valium, the greatest pharmaceutical successes of their era.
The presentation will focus on solubility, volatility, three-dimensional structure, and acid base reactions involving stimulants such as cocaine and methamphetamine, depressants such as barbiturates, anti-depressants such as Librium and Valium and narcotics such as heroin and morphine.