Lichen Planus


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lichen planus

[‚līk·ən ′plan·əs]
(medicine)
A dermatologic disease of unknown etiology that also occurs in the mouth, on the tongue, or on the lips as smooth lacy networks of white lines or, less commonly, as white patches that may become ulcerative.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Lichen Planus

 

a skin disease characterized by the eruption of pointed flat nodules with a spirally twisted fluffy hair in the center; it is one of the keratoses. It appears in children aged 2 to 3, reaches a peak between ages 15 and 20, and subsides in adulthood; it occurs more often in girls and young women. The eruptions appear mostly on the extensor surfaces of the upper and lower limbs, the buttocks, and, sometimes, the scalp. Lichen planus is associated with dry skin and slight scaling of the skin, especially on the external surface of the upper and lower limbs. The disease is often a congenital anomaly; it may be a manifestation of hypovitaminosis A. Treatment is protracted and calls for large doses of vitamins A and E and warm baths followed by rubbing in ointments containing vitamin A and agents that dissolve the horny layer of the skin. Sea bathing combined with sunbaths and radon and hydrogen sulfide baths are beneficial.

REFERENCES

Popkhristov, P. Kozhnye bolezni v detskom vozraste. Sofia, 1963. (Translated from Bulgarian.)
Spravochnik po kosmetike. Edited by M. A. Rozentul. Moscow, 1964.
Mashkilleison, L. N. Lechenie i profilaktika kozhnykh boleznei. Moscow, 1964.

IU. K. SKRIPKIN and G. IA. SHARAPOVA

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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Schipper et al., "High prevalence of esophageal involvement in lichen planus: a study using magnification chromoendoscopy," Endoscopy, vol.
Dermoscopic features of plaque psoriasis and lichen planus: new observations.
Lichen planus is the prototype of the lichenoid dermatitis group and it has a tendency to involve the skin, mucous membranes, hair and nails.
Lichen planus as a chronic mucocutaneous disease occurs in 6% of cases on the lips in the form of reticular, striatus or annular Wickham's striae, irregular (patchy) erythema and erosions, especially of the lower lip (32).
The total number of oral verruciform xanthomas with concomitant lichen planus reported in the literature including the present case amounts to twelve.
Rosin, "Molecular analysis of oral lichen planus. A premalignant lesion?," The American Journal of Pathology, vol.
In our case, the patient was followed up for lichen planus earlier by dermatologists; after recognition of mass in the left buccal mucosa, he was referred to us.
Oral lichenoid reactions are clinical and histological analogues to oral lichen planus. They appear as white hyperkeratotic thickened lesions often related to drugs, dental restorative materials, graft versus host disease, and medications.
Pemphigus vulgaris, mucosal pemphigoid, linear IgA disease, lichenoid eruptions, lichen planus, lupus erythematosus, erythema multiforme, Stevens-Johnson syndrome, toxic epidermal necrolysis, and anaphylactic stomatitis are some conditions that can be induced or triggered by certain systemic medications.
Other dermatoses observed in this study were Lichen striatus, Linear Lichen planus, inflammatory Linear verrucous epidermal nevus, Lichen nitidus, Paederus dermatitis, Hypomelanosis of Ito, Linear and Whorled nevoid hypermelanosis.