Licinius and Sextius, Laws of

The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Licinius and Sextius, Laws of

 

(Leges Liciniae Sextiae), in ancient Rome, laws passed in the interests of the plebeians by the popular tribunes Gaius Licinius Stolo and Lucius Sextius Lateranus (according to tradition, in 367 B.C.). The first law partially abolished debts and cancelled the balances on conditions favorable to the debtors. The second law prohibited ownership of more than 500 jugers (one juger was about 2,500 sq m) of land. According to the third law it was mandatory that one of the consuls be a plebeian. (According to tradition, Lucius Sextius Lateranus became the first plebeian consul in 366 B.C.)The laws of Licinius and Sextius were adopted after a long and bitter struggle (according to tradition, lasting ten years) between the patricians and the plebeians.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.