Liddell Hart


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Liddell Hart

Sir Basil Henry. 1895--1970, British military strategist and historian: he advocated the development of mechanized warfare before World War II
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The Indian Prime Minister Modi has recently announced during the Independence Day function that a new appointment of CDS will be created to 'sharpen coordination amongst the armed forces.' It has taken India twenty years to recognize the need for the appointment of CDS which was recommended in 1999 by Kargil Review Committee, underscoring the universal applicability of the Liddell Hart's famous aphorism quoted above.
Kennedy gets credit for building on Liddell Hart's work, and Luttwak's work is noted as being similar to Earle's, in that Luttwak's ideas of grand strategy are "effectively synonymous with military statecraft." In contrast, Posen's view of grand strategy, according to Milevski, focuses on "relating military ends to political means."
Liddell Hart In the forward to the Maneuver Handbook, "The only thing harder than getting a new Idea into the military mind is to get an old one out."
Today, Liddell Hart would probably encourage the West to concentrate its efforts on helping the Kurdish fighters in the Middle East and aiding Ukraine's government in Eastern Europe.
(29.) Basil Liddell Hart, "Age-old Truths of War," March 9, 1942, LH 11/1942/70, Liddell Hart Centre for Military Archives, King's College London.
(12) Even military theorist Basil Liddell Hart (1895-1970), who often has much useful to say, took some pride in working according to this procedure.
[14] Liddell Hart, B.H., (1954), Strategy--the indirect approach, New York.
Liddell Hart. And I've tried many times to get through Stephen Hawking's A Brief History of Time.
Yet he also defends Haig against the facile judgements of pseudo-historians such as Liddell Hart. Having said that he accepts that Haig's record as a military reformer and organiser must come second to his work as a battlefield commander.
German General Erich Ludendorff supposedly said the British army was made up of "lions led by donkeys," and Haig emerged as "donkey-in-chief." This image was prominent in the works of historians like Basil Liddell Hart, in The Real War [1930].
Or, as Sir Basil Henry Liddell Hart the British military historian and advisor during World War II described the military's role: The art of distributing and applying military means to fulfill the ends of policy.