Liedertafel


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Liedertafel

 

a men’s amateur choral society; Liedertafeln were popular in Germany in the 19th and early 20th centuries.

References in periodicals archive ?
The Argus (5 May 1888) noted that 'Dr Neild has said some prominent members of the Liedertafel had promised to enliven the proceedings of the Society's meetings occasionally with musical selections'.
Although it is tempting to speculate about non-Anglo membership of the Society from listed participants in these entertainments, there is no sure way of discerning whether they were Shakespeare Society folk or invited Liedertafel members, or indeed professional artistes invited by Dr Neild.
Very rarely goes out at night, but to-night there is a Liedertafel concert.
The Sunday night "President's Reception Dinner" will feature German American cuisine and entertainment by the Milwaukee Liedertafel, a German singing group just returning from a concert tour in Europe.
Many of the villages have oompah bands and liedertafel - German singing clubs.
Of particular interest to the Bruckner scholar are Elisabeth Maier's 'Kirchenmusik auf schiefen Bahnen', a study of the church music situation in Linz in the years 1850-1900 with particular reference to the Cecilian reform movement; Andrea Harrandt's 'Aus dem Archiv der Liedertafel Frohsinn', a history of the choral society with which Bruckner had close connections during his thirteen years as cathedral organist in Linz; Franz Zamazal's 'Johann Baptist Schiedermayr', a short biography of one of Bruckner's predecessors as cathedral organist, whose son of the same name was dean of the cathedral in the 1860s; Erich W.
Apart from the Musikverein, whose orchestra and choir consisted of professional musicians as well as capable amateurs, institutions such as the Akademischer Gesangsverein (Academic Choral Society), the Innsbrucker Liedertafel (Innsbruck Song Society), the Eisenbahnsangerklub (Railway Choral Club), and the Zitherklub repeatedly offered pieces from Tannhauser in their concerts, including the "Romerzahlung" ("Rome Narrative"), the "Lied an den Abendstern" ("The Evening Star"), the "Pilgerchor" ("Pilgrims' Chorus"), and the overture.