life peer

(redirected from Life Peers)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

life peer

Brit a peer whose title lapses at his death
References in periodicals archive ?
At the next election, assuming a change of government, the Labour PM would have to create 720 Life Peers for a total of 936 votes in a House of 1870 members.
Lord Taylor, aged 60, was made a life peer as Baron Taylor of Warwick in 1996 after unsuccessfully standing as the Conservative candidate in Cheltenham in the 1992 general election.
Scottish Representative Peers were not life peers. From 1701 to 1963 they were elected by their peers at each general election for the coming parliament.
It is expected the Upper Chamber would be cut from more than 750 seats to around 540, with current hereditary and appointed life peers offered generous redundancy packages.
She is one of a number of life peers named tomorrow.
PREMIER Tony Blair is set to come under intense pressure to intoduce elections for the Lords and end the appointment of life peers.
Leaks of the contents of the report point towards the retention of a large proportion of appointed life peers.
Life peers who attend regularly are furious because their favourite bars and restaurant tables in the Lords are now jam-packed with hereditary "backwoodsmen".
Dukes, marquesses, earls, viscounts and barons, combined with life peers drawn from round the country, need not be beholden to any political party for their present election and future prospects of government office, chauffeur-driven cars, rich pensions and, ultimately, wealthy directorships when they retire.
The issue of retirements has come to the fore after 58 life peers have taken their seats following May's election.
Mari Takayanagi in 'Fifty Years of Women Peers' (June 2008) was incorrect in stating that the representative peers of Scotland were life peers. The sixteen Scottish representative peers were hereditary peers who were elected to the House of Lords for each new Parliament by all the hereditary peers of Scotland, other than those with also UK, British or English peerages.
Sleaziness increases as many politicians are careerists and spout the party line; life peers, who were often financially independent, have gone; worldwide industries and money lenders exert influence though sophisticated lobbying and so on.