life expectancy

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life expectancy

[′līf ik′spek·tən·sē]
(biology)
The expected number of years that an organism will live based on statistical probability.
(engineering)
The predicted useful service life of an item of equipment.

life expectancy

the number of years the average member of a social group can expect to live. This is largely determined by environmental factors, though improvements in these do not lead to an infinitely extendable life expectancy, since the maximum period of existence of a member of the human species remains at about 110 years and biological factors impose limits less than this for most humans. The average life expectancy at birth in the UK in the late 20th-century was for men 71, and for women 76, and this has changed little in the last half century However, there is variation according to social class and region. Currently these demographic differences are widening, with life expectancy in the north of England and Scotland being significantly less than that in the south. See also BLACK REPORT, DEATH RATE AND MORTALITY RATE.
References in periodicals archive ?
Unsurprisingly, the countries with the lowest life expectancies all have high levels of poverty.
Those with lowest life expectancies include Angola, Central African Republic, Chad, Lesotho, Cote D'Ivoire, Nigeria, Somalia, South Sudan and Cameroon.
7 - the life expectancy for men in Blaenau Gwent and one of the five lowest life expectancies in England and Wales.
This might be due to the fact that life expectancies of patients at the ends of the spectrum, who are immediately sick or relatively healthy, are easier to assess as they are on more defined paths of well-being, a phenomenon that can be described as a "horizon effect;" however, moderately sick patients tend to occupy a grey zone of well-being and thus their life expectancy becomes a challenge to predict.
Scholars claim that more developed regions of the world generally have higher life expectancies than less developed regions.
The research, Best noted, "is important because it shows that the highly coveted low life expectancies sought by some investors in life settlements just are not plentiful.
Millions of the worst-off Americans have life expectancies typical of developing countries, concluded Dr.
In fact, the incentive for policy providers is to use the shortest life expectancies to provide more spread, not to boost the return of investors, Crane said.
The regulations also respond to a provision in the EGTRRA that revised the uniform life expectancy tables to reflect current life expectancies more accurately than tables issued in 1987 (see Exhibit 1).
The sidebar, "Recalculating Life Expectancies," above, describes the recalculation method more fully, including a discussion of when it might be advantageous.
This would enable the co-beneficiaries to use their own life expectancies without having to use the age of the oldest, but only if the IRA owner dies before his required beginning date.
But with life expectancies increasing, cash settlements for people with AIDS are decreasing: Whereas settlements of 80% to 90% of the value of a life insurance policy were common two or three years ago, today the average figure is closer to 50% or 60%.