Life-cycle cost


Also found in: Financial.

life-cycle cost

[′līf ‚sī·kəl ‚kȯst]
(engineering)
A measurement of the total cost of using equipment over the entire time of service of the equipment; includes initial, operating, and maintenance costs.

Life-cycle cost

The total cost of acquiring, owning, operating, and disposing of a building or building system over its entire useful life. It includes the cost of land acquisition, construction costs, energy costs, the cost to maintain, service and repair the building and its systems, costs of system replacement, financing costs, and residual or salvage value at the end of the building’s useful life.
References in periodicals archive ?
The tool aims at minimizing the life-cycle cost of chilled-water plant by finding optimally both condenser water- and chilled-water-side design variables such as chilled water and condenser piping sizes, chilled- and condenser water temperature differences [DELTA]T, and chilled-water supply temperature.
A source-selection team that wishes to use LCC or the most probable life-cycle cost (MPLCC) for cost contracts in its source-selection criteria will run into a great deal of resistance.
In conjunction with the LCCC update, AGA released "Costs Less, Lasts Longer," which discusses the parameters of initial and life-cycle cost analyses, and provides four case studies.
Life-cycle cost comparisons were made for one-lamp and three-lamp luminaires for TFLs and TLEDs, and two-lamp luminaires for TFLs and all three LED retrofit options.
General Services Administration (GSA) to consider life-cycle costs during the design of buildings for structures whose estimated construction costs top $1 million, and where the federal government is paying more than half of the construction expenses.
GAO's objectives were to (1) develop an independent estimate of the full life-cycle costs to homeport a nuclear aircraft carrier at Mayport and (2) determine to what extent the Navy's estimate meets the characteristics of a high-quality cost estimate.
These trends suggest the existence of a particular value of the maintenance period for which the expected life-cycle cost becomes a minimum value.
We pursued and were a leader in developing both molten carbonate and phosphoric acid fuel cell technologies until the late 1980s, at which point we made a strategic decision to commercialize only phosphoric acid due to its superior durability, reliability, and lower life-cycle cost.
"The structural integrity of the design along with the plant's operating features and benefits are what translates into supporting the lowest possible life-cycle cost," he says.
Many agencies are investigating economic tools such as life-cycle cost analysis (LCCA) that will help them choose the most cost-effective alternatives and communicate the value of those choices to the public.
The system must have a low life-cycle cost; must be technically robust, reliable, maintainable, socially acceptable, and affordable; must be manufactured and serviced in a developing country; and must not degrade other water quality characteristics.