life-world

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life-world

( Lebenswelt ) the natural attitude’ involved in everyday conceptions of reality, which includes ‘not only the “nature” experienced…, but also the social world’ (Schutz and Luckmann, The Structures of the Life-World, 1973).

Whereas HUSSERL'S PHENOMENOLOGY bracketed the ‘life-world’, for SCHUTZ it was the major task of SOCIAL PHENOMENOLOGY to uncover the basis of this ‘natural habitat’ of social life (of actors’ social competence), with its central problem of human ‘understanding’. For Schutz it is the ‘taken-for-granted’, ‘routine’ character of the life-world which is most striking (e.g. in contrast with SCIENCE). The ‘stocks of knowledge’ (‘what everybody knows’ – see also MUTUAL KNOWLEDGE) and the ‘interpretive schemes’ employed by social actors in bringing off everyday action, as made apparent by Schutz, become the subject matter of ETHNOMETHODOLOGY. Schutz's thinking has also influenced GIDDENS’ formulation of STRUCTURATION THEORY. see also PRACTICAL CONSCIOUSNESS.

Collins Dictionary of Sociology, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2000
References in periodicals archive ?
Puerto Rico's lifeworld is maintained via a communicatively constructed collectivity that takes the form of a mobile diaspora spanning across the vast socio-geographical borders of the United States.
In San Vicente, after the original three harvester factories filed for bankruptcy between 1978 and 1990, several San Vicente interviewees recalled the collective emotion of despair, a crisis in identity, and a shattering of their lifeworld. In response, between 1990 and 2017, the town council made choices to build a sense of community identity and culture around farm machinery.
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This approach is familiarly described as the "social construction of reality." (12) In essence, it means that the way people think, in any given society, will be determined intersubjectively, that is, by the lifeworld formed by their intersubjective experiences.
To imply that the "folk" version ought to be replaced by the disciplinary version is virtually to propose that the actual lifeworld concerns of the discourse of everyday life are themselves to be replaced by the concerns of the discipline.
In the following, I will introduce the nature of Timbunmeli's lifeworld. Although a lot has changed in Timbunmeli's lifeworld, underlying cultural premises about what kind of entities exist and how they relate to each other apparently have shown a strong resilience to change.
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The tension between restrictions and expanded lifeworlds is another recurring theme.
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Even persons with partial or total visual impairment have visions, which though different from sighted persons, are equally outward-directed toward the lifeworld and correlated to their everyday activities (Scholz 2008).