Light loss factor


Also found in: Acronyms.

Light loss factor

Also known as maintenance factor, LLF is used to calculate the illumination of a lighting system at a specific point in time under general conditions; dirt accumulation, lamp-output depreciation, maintenance procedures, and atmospheric conditions.

light loss factor

A factor used in calculating the illumination provided by a lighting system after a given period of time and under given conditions; includes the effects of temperature, voltage, ballast variations, dirt on luminaire surfaces, dirt on the room surfaces, maintenance procedures, and atmospheric conditions. There are two categories: losses which can be recovered by replacing old lamps or cleaning surfaces, and nonrecoverable losses, such as those due to component deterioration or uncontrollable voltage drops.
References in periodicals archive ?
There may also be nonrecoverable light loss factors that only occur over time, such as luminaire surface depreciation, which is rarely considered.
Be sure to consider light levels, watt input, and light loss factors (lamp lumen depreciation, luminaire and room surface dirt depreciation, and the burnout factor).
Light loss factors, color consistency, failure rate, dimming capability and quality of white light are factors that need reliable information from suppliers.